A compound that stops cells from making protein factories could lead to new antifungal drugs

A newly identified compound shows promise for fighting fungal infectionsRibosomes manufacture all the protein cells need, making them an appealing target for researchers seeking to develop new medicines. New research in yeast has identified a compound that prevents the assembly of ribosomes, raising hopes for drug development. More »

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Four Rockefeller scientists named 2016 HHMI Faculty Scholars

Daniel Kronauer, Luciano Marraffini, Agata Smogorzewska, and Sohail Tavazoie are among 84 researchers nationwide selected as the first HHMI Faculty Scholars. The new Faculty Scholars program, established by the HHMI, the Simons Foundation, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, supports early-career scientists who have potential to make unique contributions to their fields. More »

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Rockefeller neuroscientist Cori Bargmann to lead science work at Chan Zuckerberg Initiative

Cori BargmannBargmann will oversee a multi-billion dollar effort over the coming years to develop and implement a strategy to unlock understanding of the human body down to the cellular level. She will also continue as a tenured professor conducting research at Rockefeller.
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Scientists uncover a clever ranking strategy bacteria use to fight off viruses

Scientists uncover a clever ranking strategy bacteria use to fight off virusesLike humans, bacteria come under attack from viruses—and their immune systems, like ours, are capable of remembering a virus so as to preempt any future invasion. New research explores how the bacterial immune system CRISPR stores and ranks these memories. More »

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Charles M. Rice wins Lasker Award for groundbreaking work on the hepatitis C virus

Charles M. RiceThis year’s Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award honors Charles M. Rice, who developed a system to study the replication of the virus that causes hepatitis C, an advance that has led to safe and powerful new drugs that cure the disease. The award, considered the most coveted American prize in medical science, will be presented on September 23 in New York City. More »

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Researchers find combined effects of two genes responsible for premature skull fusion in infants

Researchers identify mutations responsible for premature skull fusion in infantsA combination of rare and common genetic variants can cause the bones at the top of the head to unite prematurely, resulting in deformities and, in some cases, neurodevelopmental problems. This discovery will help to diagnose the condition and identify families at risk, while advancing the understanding of complex genetic traits. More »

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Richard P. Lifton assumes office as the university’s 11th president

Richard P. Lifton assumes office as the university’s 11th presidentA physician-scientist widely recognized for uncovering the underlying causes of hypertension and other diseases, Lifton takes office on September 1. He replaces Marc Tessier-Lavigne, who left to lead Stanford University. More »

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Four postdocs honored with 2016 Tri-Institutional Breakout Awards

The prize recognizes promising young scientists from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Rockefeller University, and Weill Cornell Medicine. Four postdoctoral investigators have won the awards, which were established last year by three winners of the 2013 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences from those institutions’ faculty. More »

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Zika infection may affect adult brain cells, suggesting risk may not be limited to pregnant women

Zika infection may affect adult brain cells, suggesting risk may not be limited to pregnant womenA new study shows for the first time that the Zika virus can infect the adult brain in regions that are vital to learning and memory. The findings suggest that the virus could have more subtle effects than have been recognized, perhaps contributing to such conditions as long-term memory loss or depression. More »

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Structural images shed new light on a cancer-linked potassium channel

Structural images shed new light on a cancer-linked potassium channelUsing cryo-electron microscopy, researchers gained new insights about how the channel functions, based on what they saw in the section that spans the cell’s membrane. The channel has been found in a number of cell types, including in tumors, where it is thought to have a cancer-promoting effect. More »

Daniel Mucida, who studies the gut’s specialized immune system, receives promotion

Daniel Mucida, who studies the gut’s specialized immune system, receives promotionAs head of the Laboratory of Mucosal Immunology, Mucida examines how immune cells within the lining of the intestine balance vigilance against invaders with tolerance to harmless foreign proteins. As of September 1, he will become an associate professor. More »

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New antibody drug continues to show promise for treatment of HIV

New antibody drug continues to show promise for treatment of HIVAntibody therapy may offer an alternative to standard HIV treatments, which require a strict regimen and can cause complications in the long-term. New results from a clinical trial show that the 3BNC117 antibody can significantly delay the virus from rebounding in patients taken off their current medications. More »

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Resistance to antidepressants linked to metabolism

Resistance to antidepressants linked to metabolismRecent findings by a Rockefeller University team might offer new clues about why some patients don’t respond to antidepressants. While investigating resistance to treatment in rats, the scientists uncovered changes in genes that control metabolism. More »

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Study suggests humans can detect even the smallest units of light

Researches have found new evidence of just how sensitive an instrument the human eye is. When adjusted to the dark, the eye can detect the occurrence of a single photon, according to a recent study. More »

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Rockefeller’s newest faculty member studies birdsong to illuminate the origins of human language

Rockefeller’s newest faculty member studies bird song to illuminate the origins of human languageErich Jarvis, currently a professor at Duke University, uses songbirds as a model to study the mechanisms that underlie how individuals learn spoken language. He will be joining Rockefeller as a professor this fall. More »

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New approach exposes 3D structure of Alzheimer’s proteins within the brain

New approach exposes 3D structure of Alzheimer’s proteins within the brainUsing an approach that makes brain tissue transparent, researchers were able to view clumps of the toxic protein amyloid-β from multiple angles within mouse and human brains. More »

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Postdoc John Maciejowski wins 2016 Regeneron Prize for Creative Innovation

Postdoc John Maciejowski wins 2016 Regeneron Prize for Creative InnovationThe award, given by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., honors innovative young scientists based on proposals they submit of a “dream” biomedical research project they would undertake if they had access to any resource or technology. Maciejowski will receive a $50,000 prize and a $5,000 donation to Rockefeller. More »

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Neurobiologist interested in memory to join Rockefeller faculty

Priya RajasethupathyPriya Rajasethupathy, currently a postdoc at Stanford, is working to understand how molecules and neural circuits interact to store and retrieve information. She will join the faculty in May 2017 as an assistant professor. More »

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An unexpected origin for calming immune cells in the gut

An unexpected origin for calming immune cells in the gutWithin the gut, the immune system must strike a perfect balance between protecting our bodies from infection and not overreacting to harmless foreign entities, including food. A new study explores the origins of a type of immune cell that appears to keep inflammatory responses in check. More »

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Michel C. Nussenzweig honored with the 2016 Robert Koch Award

Michel C. Nussenzweig honored with the 2016 Robert Koch AwardGiven by the Robert Koch Foundation, the annual award is one of Germany’s most prestigious scientific prizes, honoring extraordinary accomplishments in infectious disease research. Nussenzweig will share the €100,000 prize with Alberto Mantovani of Humanitas University for their achievements in immunology. More »

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