Yearly Archives: 2014

In The News Q&A Torsten Wiesel

Q&A: Torsten Wiesel   “Torsten Wiesel is president emeritus of Rockefeller University in New York City. He shared half of the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with David Hubel for their discoveries concerning information processing in the visual … More »

Tags:

One signal means different things to stem cells versus their progeny

One signal means different things to stem cells versus their progenyWhen researchers shut down hair follicle stem cells’ ability to respond to a protein, the cells began dividing prematurely. Meanwhile, when the same was done to their progeny cells, the fate of these cells shifted. More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Single gene links susceptibility to rare infections with predisposition to autoimmune disease

Single gene links susceptibility to rare infections with predisposition to autoimmune diseaseWhen scientists scanned the brains of patients who lack a particular immune protein, they saw calcium deposits linked with certain diseases that occur as a result of harmful and unnecessary inflammation. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Atomic map reveals clues to how cholesterol is made

Atomic map reveals clues to how cholesterol is madeAn enzyme embedded in the cell membrane performs a crucial step in the complex process by which cells produce cholesterol. Researchers have examined the enzyme’s structure to better understand how it works. More »

Tags: , , , ,

Newly discovered brain cells explain a prosocial effect of oxytocin

Newly discovered brain cells explain a prosocial effect of oxytocinWhen activated by the ‘love hormone’ oxytocin, a class of star-shaped neurons in the brain’s cortex encourages female mice to take an interest in males, but only when the females are in heat. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

In the News – McEwen – NewSci

Brave or reckless? Thrill-seekers’ brains can tell you   “‘It really has to do with the reckless and the brave,’ says Bruce McEwen at Rockefeller University, New York, who wasn’t involved with the work. The brave feel fear but are … More »

Tags:

Rockefeller neurobiology lab is awarded first-round BRAIN initiative grant

Rockefeller neurobiology lab is awarded first-round BRAIN initiative grantResearchers are developing a technology that uses radio waves or magnetic fields to turn neurons on or off remotely. This tool may allow them to study the role of neural circuits in behavior. More »

Tags: , , ,

‘Programmable’ antibiotic harnesses an enzyme to attack drug-resistant microbes

“Programmable” antibiotic harnesses an enzyme to attack drug-resistant microbesBy co-opting a system bacteria normally use to defend themselves, researchers targeted and killed off colonies of the antibiotic resistant Staph cells on mouse skin. The treatment left behind the drug-susceptible microbes. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Rockefeller postdoc Stephen Brohawn named Blavatnik Award regional finalist

Rockefeller postdoc Stephen Brohawn named Blavatnik Award regional finalistBrohawn, a member of Roderick MacKinnon’s Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology and Biophysics, studies how proteins called mechanosensitive ion channels sense mechanical forces. He is one of nine finalists from the New York region. More »

Tags:

Stanford’s Lucy Shapiro to receive 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Stanford's Lucy Shapiro to receive 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize The Rockefeller University has announced that Lucy Shapiro, professor of developmental biology at Stanford University School of Medicine, will receive the 2014 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize. The annual award, which celebrates the achievements of outstanding women in science, will be presented to Shapiro on the Rockefeller campus November 11. More »

Tags:

New technique reveals a role for histones in cell division

New technique reveals a role for histones in cell divisionResearchers have found that key aspects of cell division, such as the formation of the support structure for the envelope that surrounds the nucleus, depend on the presence of DNA-organizing proteins known as histones. More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Imaging studies open a window on how effective antibodies are formed

Imaging studies open a window on how effective antibodies are formedBy imaging the immune response, researchers have observed how two types of immune cells interact with one another during a critical period following infection in order to prepare the best antibodies and establish long-lasting protection. More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Hironori Funabiki promoted to professor

Funabiki’s research has pointed to a role for DNA-packaging proteins known as histones in the formation of structures involved in cell division, with implications for understanding and treating disease. More »

Tags: , , ,

In the News – Washington Post

New ‘cool videos’ from NIH look at Alzheimer’s, heart attacks, MS, coral reefs   “A ‘stop heart attack’ refrain echoes through Rockefeller University’s ‘molecular biomedicine music video’ featuring some flashy animation and seriously geeky dancing.”

Tags:

Research hints at why stress is more devastating for some

Research hints at why stress is more devastating for someSome bounce back from stress, while others struggle with it, even developing anxiety and depression as a result. In experiments with mice, researchers have revealed the molecular origins of this so-called stress gap.
More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful versus helpful viruses

Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful versus helpful virusesViruses can kill bacteria, or viruses can help the microbes by lending them potentially useful genes. New research shows Staph bacteria have an immune system capable of distinguishing dangerous invaders from potentially beneficial ones. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Research explains how cellular guardians of the gut develop

Research explains how cellular guardians of the intestine developA specialized class of immune cell inhabits the thin layer of tissue that lines the intestine. New experiments reveal how these cells arise, sometimes from other mature immune cells. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Antibodies, together with viral ‘inducers,’ found to control HIV in mice

Antibodies, together with viral ‘inducers,’ found to control HIV in miceA new strategy devised by researchers at Rockefeller University harnesses the power of broadly neutralizing antibodies, along with a combination of compounds that induce viral transcription, in order to attack latent reservoirs of HIV-infected cells in an approach termed ‘shock and kill.’ More »

Tags: , , , , ,

In the News

Reducing Carbon by Curbing Population   “As the threat of climate change has evolved from a fuzzy faraway concept to one of the central existential threats to humanity, scholars like Professor [Joel E.] Cohen have noted that reducing the burning … More »

Tags: , ,

An embryonic cell’s fate is sealed by the speed of a signal

An embryonic cell’s fate is sealed by the speed of a signalEarly in development, chemical signals tell cells whether to turn into muscle, bone, brain or other tissue. By tracking cells’ responses to signals, researchers found the speed at which the signal arrives has an unexpected influence on that decision. More »

Tags: , , , , , ,