Fifty years after landmark methadone discovery, stigmas and misunderstandings persist

Fifty years after landmark methadone discovery, stigmas and misunderstandings persistIn 1966, Rockefeller scientists published a landmark paper that would lead to the first medical treatment for heroin addiction. The drug has helped millions of heroin users around the world, yet its use in the United States remains controversial.
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First structural map of the cystic fibrosis protein sheds light on how mutations cause disease

First structural map of the cystic fibrosis protein sheds light on how mutations cause diseaseA map that shows the arrangement of atoms within the cystic fibrosis protein will help researchers better understand how specific mutations cause disease. Ultimately, this knowledge may reveal potential targets for new drugs. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive 2016 Vanderbilt Prize in Biomedical Science

Elaine Fuchs to receive 2016 Vanderbilt Prize in Biomedical ScienceThe prize, given by Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, recognizes women with outstanding research accomplishments who have also made significant contributions to mentoring other women in science. Fuchs is being honored for her innovative use of reverse genetics to understand skin diseases and cancer stem cells. More »

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Survey of New York City soil uncovers medicine-making microbes

Survey of New York City soil uncovers medicine-making microbesSifting soil from city parks, scientists have found microbial genes capable of making compounds whose potent effects can make them valuable tools in the fight against disease. Their research suggests that many more await discovery, even in a place as mundane as urban dirt. More »

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Rockefeller’s Science Outreach program explores the microbes in food

Rockefeller’s Science Outreach program explores the microbes in foodHigh school students designed research projects to investigate the role that microscopic organisms play in cheeses and other foods. The program aims to let students experience the scientific method firsthand. More »

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Jean-Laurent Casanova receives the 2016 Inserm Grand Prix

Jean-Laurent CasanovaGiven by Inserm, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, the Grand Prix honors researchers whose work has contributed to the institute’s scientific excellence. Casanova is being recognized for his work on the genetic basis of infectious diseases. More »

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New research clarifies why wounds heal more slowly with age

New research clarifies why wounds heal more slowly with age With age, it takes longer for skin cells to close an injury. New research shows that a breakdown in communication between these cells and neighboring immune cells causes this delay—a discovery that has implications for improving healing among older people. More »

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Gaby Maimon, who studies sophisticated brain functions in fruit flies, is promoted to associate professor

Gaby Maimon, who studies sophisticated brain functions in fruit flies, is promoted to associate professorAs head of the Laboratory of Integrative Brain Function, Maimon uses flies to study the computations with which the brain estimates values like angles and time. His promotion is effective January 1. More »

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Researchers discover new antibiotics by sifting through the human microbiome

MRSA screenThe bacteria we carry within us could be a untapped source of new drugs. Researchers put this idea to the test by mining the human microbiome for new antibiotics—and identified two compounds that might be effective against some particularly dangerous bacteria. More »

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Researchers shed new light on RNA’s journey out of a cell’s nucleus

Researchers shed new light on RNA’s journey out of a cell’s nucleusTo make proteins, cells must export RNA from their carefully guarded nuclei. Researchers have determined the structure of one important component of the restrictive gate through which this cargo must pass, with implications for understanding disease. More »

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Scientists prove how genetics change behavior by studying worms’ foraging strategies

Scientists prove how genetics change behavior by studying worms’ foraging strategiesLike all animals, C. elegans worms pay attention to their peers and can adjust their behavior in response to competition. Neuroscientists have discovered a genetic component of this social phenomenon, providing concrete biological evidence for game theory. More »

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Researchers watch in 3D as neurons talk to each other in a living mouse brain

Researchers watch in 3D as neurons talk to each other in a living mouse brainWhen the brain is at work, neurons talk rapidly to one another, forming networks. Using a new method based on so-called light sculpting, scientists have recorded the activity in these networks within three-dimensional sections of the brains of mice. More »

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Pioneering drug discovery company Bridge Medicines launched to advance promising early technologies in major academic institutions through human proof of concept

Pioneering drug discovery company bridge medicines launched to advance promising early technologies in major academic institutions through human proof of conceptThe Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, a partnership between Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, The Rockefeller University, Weill Cornell Medicine and Takeda, joins with Deerfield Management and Bay City Capital to create an accelerated path to innovative therapies to treat disease.
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Winrich Freiwald wins Columbia University’s 2016 W. Alden Spencer Award

Winrich FreiwaldThe award, given by Columbia University, recognizes outstanding research contributions in neuroscience. Freiwald, who shares the prize with his long-time collaborator Doris Y. Tsao of Caltech, will present an award lecture on November 1 at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. More »

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Genomic testing could speed research on skin disease and bring new drugs to patients faster

Mayte Suarez-Farinas and Joel Correa da Rosa in Greenberg BuildingWhen a person suffering from psoriasis starts taking a new therapy, it can currently take months to assess if the drug is working. But according to a recent study, that process could be significantly sped up with genomic testing and analysis. More »

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Study uncovers how cells organize the growth of their structural filaments

Study uncovers how cells organize the growth of their structural filamentsResearchers have described how two proteins work together to guide the assembly of important structural elements known as microtubules within the cell. This discovery helps explain how cells prepare to use these filaments. More »

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A possible explanation for why male mice tolerate stress better than females

A possible explanation for why male mice tolerate stress better than femalesRockefeller scientists have described a molecular mechanism that may explain in part why anxiety levels vary between the sexes. The research team identified a molecule that halts the action of a stress-inducing hormone—but it only does so in male mice. More »

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Sebastian Klinge receives 2016 NIH New Innovator Award

Sebastian KlingeGiven by the NIH, the Director’s New Innovator Award recognizes early-career investigators with five-year grants of up to $1.5 million. The award is designed to encourage recipients to pursue projects that have the potential for unusually high impact. Klinge is one of 48 recipients of the prestigious award this year. More »

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Rockefeller graduate Monica Mugnier wins 2016 NIH Early Independence Award

Monica MugnierA 2016 graduate of Rockefeller’s Ph.D. program, Mugnier is one of 16 junior scientists across the country to receive an Early Independence Award. The award, which is given as a five-year grant of up to $1.25 million, allows exceptional investigators to skip postdoctoral training and move immediately into independent research positions. More »

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Study explains how an intestinal microbe protects against other, more dangerous bacteria

Worm Cross Section ThumbnailWorking in animal models, scientists have found that an enzyme produced by one microbe can shield the gut against attack from other, more harmful bacteria. The findings could potentially inform the design of new probiotics for use against dangerous pathogens like those spreading hospital-acquired infections. More »

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