The Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation provides landmark gift of $100 Million to The Rockefeller University

The Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation provides landmark gift  of $100 Million to The Rockefeller UniversityMarc Tessier-Lavigne, president of The Rockefeller University, today announced a leadership gift of $100 million from The Marie-Josée and Henry R. Kravis Foundation to help create a new laboratory building that will be the centerpiece of the University’s major planned campus extension. More »

Gaby Maimon honored with a McKnight Scholar Award

Gaby Maimon honored with a McKnight Scholar AwardMaimon, the head of the Laboratory of Integrative Brain Function, will receive $75,000 per year for three years to support his research. Given by The McKnight Endowment Fund, the award seeks to support young scientists whose work could have implications for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of brain diseases. More »

Tags: , , ,

Research shows how antibodies produce vaccine-like effect against tumors

Research shows how antibodies produce vaccine-like effect against tumorsAntibody therapy not only kills cancerous cells, it can confer lasting protection by priming the immune system to remember a tumor. Scientists have found this process centers on antibody-binding receptors found on two types of immune cells. Their results suggest ways to improve anti-cancer treatments. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Fragments of tRNA suggest a novel mechanism for cancer progression

Fragments of tRNA suggest a novel mechanism for cancer progressionResearchers discover that particular genetic fragments, of a type of RNA known as transfer RNA, or tRNA, appear to be capable of reducing the growth and spread of breast cancer cells. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Rockefeller scientists resolve long-standing debate over how many bacteria fight off invaders

For years, researchers have puzzled over conflicting results about the workings of type III CRISPR-Cas systems, a type of immune system found in many species of bacteria. Some data showed that this mechanism would target the virus’s DNA, while other experiments suggested it could only disable a virus once it had started replicating itself. New results suggest both mechanisms play a role.
More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Paul Nurse to receive Friesen International Prize

Paul Nurse to receive Friesen International PrizePaul Nurse, president emeritus at Rockefeller, has been awarded the Henry G. Friesen International Prize in Health Research. The prize honors him as a pioneering scientist, science advocate, and policy maker who has had an important impact on science through excellence in research, leadership, and communication. More »

Tags: , ,

Odd histone helps suppress jumping genes in stem cells, study says

Odd histone helps suppress jumping genes in stem cells, study saysThe histone variant H3.3 appears to help keep certain genetic elements called retrotransponsons in place in the genome, preventing potentially harmful mutations in mouse embryonic stem cells, researchers have found. This discovery reveals a basic mechanism for epigenetics, or the control of inherited traits through means other than DNA. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Leslie Vosshall and Jean-Laurent Casanova elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Jean-Laurent Casanova and Leslie Vosshall elected to the National Academy of SciencesVosshall, who investigates how sensory stimuli are perceived and processed, and Casanova, who studies the genetics of infectious disease susceptibility in children, are among the new members and foreign associates to be inducted into the Academy in 2015. With Vosshall and Casanova’s election, Rockefeller now boasts 36 members or foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences among its current faculty.

More »

Tags: , , , ,

Elaine Fuchs wins cell biologists’ highest honor

Elaine Fuchs wins cell biologists’ highest honorIn recognition of her pioneering research on mammalian skin and adult stem cells, Fuchs has received the E.B. Wilson Medal, the highest scientific honor bestowed by the American Society for Cell Biology. The medal will be presented at the society’s annual meeting in California on December 15. More »

Tags:

Charles Rice to receive 2015 Robert Koch Award

Charles Rice to receive the 2015 Robert Koch AwardGranted by the Robert Koch Foundation, the annual award is one of Germany’s most distinguished scientific prizes and honors extraordinary accomplishments in infectious disease research. It recognizes Rice’s work on understanding the lifecycle of the hepatitis C virus and laying the groundwork for effective therapeutic developments. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Research on the genetic roots of a blood disorder illustrates the challenges in parsing genetic data

Research on the genetic roots of a blood disorder illustrates the challenges in parsing genetic dataDoes a particular genetic variation translate into a predisposition to an illness, or is it simply a benign rearrangement of genetic code? Drawing up on genomic data from thousands of people, researchers attempted to answer this question by focusing on mutations in two genes associated with a key receptor in blood clotting. More »

In first human study, new antibody therapy shows promise in suppressing HIV infection

In first human study, new antibody therapy shows promise in suppressing HIV infectionIn the first results to emerge from HIV patient trials of a new generation of so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies, Rockefeller University researchers have found the experimental therapy can dramatically reduce the amount of virus present in a patient’s blood. The work, reported this week in Nature, brings fresh optimism to the field of HIV immunotherapy and suggests new strategies for fighting or even preventing HIV infection. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Under the microscope, strong-swimming swamp bacteria spontaneously organize into crystals

Under the microscope, strong-swimming swamp bacteria spontaneously organize into crystalsBiophysicists have discovered that fast-swimming, sulfur-eating microbes known as Thiovulum majus can form a two-dimensional lattice of rotating cells. Not only is this the first known example of bacteria spontaneously creating such a pattern, never before have living things been seen to move together in this way. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

The Rockefeller University designated a “Milestones in Microbiology” site by the American Society for Microbiology

The designation is made in recognition of the many outstanding achievements of Rockefeller scientists, and in particular for ground-breaking discoveries by Oswald T. Avery, Colin M. MacLeod, Maclyn McCarty, Peyton Rous, and Emil C. Gotschlich. It will be formally announced at a dedication ceremony on April 8. More »

Intellectual property on pediatric cancer is dedicated to the public

Intellectual property resulting from the discovery of specific DNA mutations linked to a rare and often deadly type of adolescent liver cancer, fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma, has been dedicated to the public by the institutions that made the discovery, The Rockefeller University and the New York Genome Center, in the hope of accelerating progress toward the delivery of diagnostics and therapies for the devastating disease. More »

Rockefeller ranks first among global universities in several measures of scientific impact

Genetic mutation helps explain why, in rare cases, flu can killThe rankings, released by the European Commission-funded U-Multirank survey, placed Rockefeller among the top five institutions in five key categories. Across the entire set of rankings, which incorporates data from 1,200 institutions, Rockefeller was the only institution to receive this many top slots.
More »

Genetic mutation helps explain why, in rare cases, flu can kill

Genetic mutation helps explain why, in rare cases, flu can killA small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital even while their family and friends recover easily. New research from Rockefeller helps explain why: a rare genetic mutation that prevents the production of a critical protein, interferon, that is needed to fight off the virus. More »

Tags: , , , ,

To survive, a parasite mixes and matches its disguises, study suggests

To survive, a parasite mixes and matches its disguises, study suggests A detailed look at the African sleeping sickness parasite’s strategy for evading its hosts’ immune systems revealed that the blood parasites assume a surprising diversity of protein coat disguises. In fact, the number of disguises necessary to maintain a long-term infection appears to exceed the functional genes that encode them. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Researchers master gene editing technique in mosquito that transmits deadly diseases

Researchers master gene editing technique in mosquito that transmits deadly diseasesRockefeller University researchers have successfully harnessed a technique, CRISPR-Cas9 editing, to use in an important and understudied species: the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which infects hundreds of millions of people annually with the deadly diseases chikungunya, yellow fever, and dengue fever. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Chemical tag marks future microRNAs for processing, study shows

Chemical tag marks future microRNAs for processing, study showsNew research reveals how cells sort out the RNA molecules destined to become gene-regulating microRNAs by tagging them. Because microRNAs help control processes throughout the body, this discovery has wide-ranging implications for development, health and disease, including cancer.
More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,