Hironori Funabiki promoted to professor

Funabiki’s research has pointed to a role for DNA-packaging proteins known as histones in the formation of structures involved in cell division, with implications for understanding and treating disease. More »

Tags: , , ,

Research hints at why stress is more devastating for some

Research hints at why stress is more devastating for someSome bounce back from stress, while others struggle with it, even developing anxiety and depression as a result. In experiments with mice, researchers have revealed the molecular origins of this so-called stress gap.
More »

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful versus helpful viruses

Discovery reveals how bacteria distinguish harmful versus helpful virusesViruses can kill bacteria, or viruses can help the microbes by lending them potentially useful genes. New research shows Staph bacteria have an immune system capable of distinguishing dangerous invaders from potentially beneficial ones. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Research explains how cellular guardians of the gut develop

Research explains how cellular guardians of the intestine developA specialized class of immune cell inhabits the thin layer of tissue that lines the intestine. New experiments reveal how these cells arise, sometimes from other mature immune cells. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Antibodies, together with viral ‘inducers,’ found to control HIV in mice

Antibodies, together with viral ‘inducers,’ found to control HIV in miceA new strategy devised by researchers at Rockefeller University harnesses the power of broadly neutralizing antibodies, along with a combination of compounds that induce viral transcription, in order to attack latent reservoirs of HIV-infected cells in an approach termed ‘shock and kill.’ More »

Tags: , , , , ,

An embryonic cell’s fate is sealed by the speed of a signal

An embryonic cell’s fate is sealed by the speed of a signalEarly in development, chemical signals tell cells whether to turn into muscle, bone, brain or other tissue. By tracking cells’ responses to signals, researchers found the speed at which the signal arrives has an unexpected influence on that decision. More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Jean-Laurent Casanova honored with 2014 Sanofi-Institut Pasteur Award

Jean-Laurent Casanova honored with 2014 Sanofi-Institut Pasteur AwardCasanova is recognized for discovering “holes” in the immune systems of otherwise healthy children that make them susceptible to specific, sometimes life-threatening infectious diseases. More »

Small RNAs in blood may reveal heart injury

SmallBy profiling the small RNAs circulating in the blood of healthy people versus those with heart failure, a research team identified three so-called microRNAs with the potential for use as indicators of injury to heart muscle. More »

Tags: , , ,

Medical innovation requires federal support and structural improvements, Marc Tessier-Lavigne tells members of Congress

Medical innovation requires federal support and structural improvements, Marc Tessier-Lavigne tells members of CongressSpeaking at a hearing on public versus private contributions to medical breakthroughs, Rockefeller’s president explained the ecosystem responsible for taking a biological insight on, for example, how tumors spread, and turning it into a treatment that improves or saves lives. He also offered suggestions for how the federal government could further encourage such breakthroughs.
More »

Discovery of pro-metastasis protein reveals mysterious link to neurodegeneration

Discovery of pro-metastasis protein reveals mysterious link to neurodegenerationMice injected with metastatic breast cancer cells showed less metastasis when researchers silenced the protein TARBP2 in these cells. TARBP2 appears to promote metastasis in part by blocking suppressor genes, including two linked with neurodegeneration. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Researchers create the first model of the DNA ‘replication fork’

Researchers create the first model of the DNA ‘replication fork’This new tool promises to allow scientists to explore the as-yet-unknown details of how cells unzip the double-stranded DNA molecule and replicate it, a process crucial to life. More »

Tags: , , ,

New faculty member uses genetic sequencing to investigate childhood brain disease

New faculty member uses genetic sequencing to investigate childhood brain diseaseJoseph Gleeson, a neurogeneticist, has left the University of California, San Diego, to establish his lab at Rockefeller, where he will continue hunting down the single-gene mutations responsible for an array of neurodevelopmental disorders. More »

Genetically driven gut feelings help female flies choose a mate

Genetically driven gut feelings help female flies choose a mateResearchers at Rockefeller University have determined that the Abdominal-B (Abd-B) gene, previously known as the gene that sculpts the posterior parts of the developing fly, is also important for a complex courtship behavior, at least in the case of female flies. More »

Tags: , , ,

Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselves

Using geometry, researchers coax human embryonic stem cells to organize themselvesBy confining colonies of human embryonic stem cells to tiny circular patterns on glass plates, researchers have for the first time coaxed them into organizing themselves just as they would under natural conditions. More »

Tags: , , , ,

Potential Alzheimer’s drug prevents abnormal blood clots in the brain

Potential Alzheimer’s drug prevents abnormal blood clots in the brainThe brains of Alzheimer’s mice treated with the compound RU-505 showed less inflammation and better blood flow than those of untreated mice. The treated mice also performed better on memory tests. More »

Tags: , , , , , ,

Sequencing efforts miss DNA crucial to bacteria’s disease causing power

Sequencing efforts miss DNA crucial to bacteria’s disease causing powerPieces of DNA, including viruses, found outside a microbe’s chromosomes may play a role in disease, but are nearly impossible to identify and sequence using conventional techniques. Researchers at Rockefeller have developed a solution. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Jean-Laurent Casanova to receive 2014 Robert Koch Award

Jean-Laurent Casanova to receive 2014 Robert Koch Award Casanova is honored for his work on host genes and their products in infectious diseases. His lab is interested in why some children develop severe infectious diseases after coming into contact with certain pathogens, while most other children do not. More »

Tags: , , , ,

New monkey model for AIDS offers promise for medical research

New monkey model for AIDS offers promise for medical researchRockefeller University researchers announce that they have coaxed a slightly modified form of the HIV-1 virus to not only infect pigtailed macaques but to cause full blown AIDS in the primates, an accomplishment that could accelerate the search for new AIDS treatments or vaccines. More »

Structural biologist, focused on cell transport machinery, to join faculty

Structural biologist, focused on cell transport machinery, to join facultyJue Chen, currently a tenured professor of biology at Purdue University in Indiana and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator, studies transporter proteins that act as the cell’s pumping machinery, and their role in health and disease. More »

Tags: , , ,

Twenty-four students receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 56th Convocation

The Rockefeller University awarded doctoral degrees to 24 students at its convocation ceremony today. Additionally, the university awarded three honorary degrees, to John Gurdon, Julian Robertson and Sinya Yamanaka. Each doctoral candidate was presented for the degree by his or her mentor, a tradition dating back to the university’s first commencement ceremony in 1959.
More »