Search Results for: Titia de Lange

Titia de Lange to receive Canada Gairdner International Award

de Lange is being recognized for her discovery of the mechanisms by which mammalian telomeres are protected from deleterious DNA repair and damage responses. The Gairdner is Canada’s highest scientific award and is considered among the most prestigious international prizes in science. More »

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Cori Bargmann, Titia de Lange win inaugural Breakthrough Prizes worth $3 million

Two Rockefeller University scientists are among 11 winners of the first annual Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences, an award established by six tech entrepreneurs dedicated to advancing breakthrough research. At $3 million each, the prizes are worth more than twice the amount of the Nobel. They were created to recognize excellence in research aimed at curing intractable diseases and extended human life.

Administered by a new non-profit organization, the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences Foundation, the prize is founded by Art Levinson, chairman of the board of Apple and former CEO of Genentech; Sergey Brin, co-founder of Google Inc.; Anne Wojcicki, co-founder of 23andMe; Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, and his wife Pricilla Chan; and Yuri Milner, founder of the Russian internet company Mail.ru. More »

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Titia de Lange to receive Heineken Prize

De Lange is honored for her work on telomeres, the protective DNA sequences located at the tips of chromosomes which play a crucial role in such processes as ageing and cancer.

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Titia de Lange receives 2011 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science

Rockefeller researcher is honored for her research on mechanisms that help maintain genome stability. More »

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Titia de Lange receives AACR Clowes Award

Titia de Lange is the 50th annual recipient of the American Association of Cancer Research’s award to an individual with outstanding recent accomplishments in basic cancer research. More »

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Titia de Lange awarded grant, named American Cancer Society Research Professor

The head of Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics has received a $400,000 grant from the American Cancer Society and has been named an American Cancer Society Research Professor. The five-year grant, which is effective January 1, 2010, will fund de Lange’s continuing research on telomeres, the strings of extra DNA that cap and protect the ends of chromosomes through numerous cycles of cell division. More »

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Titia de Lange receives NIH Pioneer Award

The National Insitutes of Health has selected Titia de Lange, who examines how cells respond to DNA damage, to receive up to $500,000 in direct costs per year for five years. The prestigious Pioneer Award, now in its second year, supports groundbreaking, high-risk research that, if successful, will have a significant impact. More »

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Scientists discover new way protein degradation is regulated

Researchers at The Rockefeller University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have identified the mechanism by which the cell’s protein recycler, the proteasome, ramps up its activity to take care of unwanted and potentially toxic proteins. The finding, which has implications for treating muscle wasting and neurodegeneration, also suggests that small molecule inhibitors of this mechanism may be clinically useful in treating multiple myeloma. More »

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Teresa Davoli wins 2013 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Davoli, a native of Italy, studied a new mechanism of tetraploidization that is induced by dysfunctional telomeres. The Weintraub Awards recognize quality, originality and significance of thesis research. More »

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA online: January 22, 2013

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA online: January 22, 2013 Role of 53BP1 oligomerization in regulating double-strand break repair Francisca Lottersberger, Anne Bothmer, Davide F. Robbiani, Michel C.  Nussenzweig and Titia de Lange

Pearl Meister Greengard Prize to be awarded to pioneering RNA researcher Joan Steitz

A prestigious Rockefeller University award for exceptional women scientists recognizes a pioneer in the field of RNA biology whose discoveries involved patients with a variety of autoimmune diseases. Steitz will receive the award from National Geographic Explorer in Residence Sylvia Earle at a ceremony in Rockefeller’s Caspary Auditorium on November 29. More »

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Johannes Scheid wins 2012 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Scheid is one of 13 awardees, all advanced graduate students at or near the completion of their studies in the biological sciences and chosen for the quality, originality and significance of their thesis research.
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2011 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize to be awarded to McGill University memory researcher

Brenda Milner, a pioneer in the field of cognitive neuroscience whose discoveries revolutionized the understanding of memory, will be awarded the 2011 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize from The Rockefeller University.
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2008 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize awarded to three leading biologists

The Rockefeller University has announced the winners of the fifth annual Pearl Meister Greengard Prize: Elizabeth H. Blackburn of the University of California, San Francisco; Carol W. Greider of The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; and Vicki Lundblad of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The three women are pioneers in the study of the enzyme telomerase, which plays a central role in the repair of telomeres. More »

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Nadya Dimitrova wins 2009 Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Nadya Dimitrova, a graduate fellow in Titia de Lange’s Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics at Rockefeller University, has been named one of 13 winners of this year’s Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, administered by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. More »

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Eroded telomeres are behind a rare premature aging syndrome

At a time when the world seems to be age-obsessed, researchers at Rockefeller University reveal the molecular defect behind a rare yet fatal premature aging syndrome, findings that may ultimately help scientists disentangle which genes play a role in the normal aging process from those involved in age-related disease. More »

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De Lange, Nussenzweig elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Rockefeller University faculty will become members of the independent policy and research center devoted to studying complex emerging problems. More »

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Evidence of rapid evolution is found at the tips of chromosomes

Humans like to think of themselves at the top of the evolutionary ladder, but new research from Titia de Lange’s lab at Rockefeller University shows that we may have slipped a few rungs in favor of a smaller, fuzzier mammal. While studying the role of a protein called POT1 in telomeres, de Lange’s lab found that mice have evolved ahead, expanding the one gene found in humans into two, each with a distinct function. Their research has important implications for the future of telomere biology. More »

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Four Rockefeller scientists elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Titia de Lange, Charles D. Gilbert, Michael E. O’Donnell and Jeffrey V. Ravetch, all heads of laboratories at Rockefeller University, have been elected to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, a private organization of scientists and engineers dedicated to the furtherance of science and its use for the general welfare. More »

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Newly Identified Protein Caps Chromosomes Ends

A newly isolated protein is a vital part of human telomeres, the shields that guard the ends of chromosomes against damage and destruction. Scientists at Rockefeller University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center report their identification and cloning of the protein in the Dec. 8 Science. More »

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