Neurobiologist visits Rockefeller as part of renewed scientific exchange program with Karolinska Institute

Thomas Perlmann, a neurobiologist at the Karolinska Institute who studies the dopamine-producing cells that die during the development of Parkinson’s disease, will visit the Rockefeller University campus this week and give the Nicholson Lecture on Friday. The lecture is part of a recently renewed program that supports research exchanges between the university and the Karolinska Institute. More »

Michael W. Young to receive 2011 Horwitz Prize for studies on molecular basis of circadian rhythms

Michael W. Young will share Columbia University’s Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize with with Jeffrey C. Hall and Michael Rosbash for their work on the molecular basis of circadian rhythms. His research provides a basis for the development of possible treatments for hereditary sleep disorders in humans. More »

Rockefeller University scientist Ralph Steinman, honored today with Nobel Prize for discovery of dendritic cells, dies at 68

Rockefeller University cell biologist Ralph M. Steinman, who discovered the immune system’s sentinel dendritic cells and demonstrated that science can fruitfully harness the power of these cells and other components of the immune system to curb infections and other communicable diseases, is this year’s recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm, Sweden, announced today. He shares half the prize with Bruce A. Beutler and Jules A. Hoffmann. More »

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Papavasiliou and Stavropoulos receive “transformative” NIH grant

Rockefeller University’s Nina Papavasiliou will receive a grant from the National Institutes of Health under a program designed to encourage high-risk, high impact research. The grant will fund efforts to develop new ways of engineering therapeutic antibodies that could lead to novel vaccines for a number of communicable diseases ranging from HIV to flu as well as non-communicable diseases, such as various cancers, neurodegenerative diseases and drug addiction. More »

Gaby Maimon named one of Popular Science’s “Brilliant Ten”

The honor recognizes Maimon’s development of a technique to monitor electrical activity in individual neurons as fruit flies navigate a virtual world in “tethered flight.” Maimon’s platform provides a bridge to link genes, through the electrical activity of neurons, to fly behavior. In his system, flies are attached to a small plate where they can flap their wings in “tethered flight.” More »

Rockefeller University receives $36.1 million to help translate science into cures

Rockefeller University’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), a center aimed at accelerating the pace of translating science into real-life solutions for patients, has received $36.1 million from the National Institutes of Health to expand its work over the next five years. The CCTS is among 10 institutes nationwide to receive the renewed funding, in recognition of their successes during the first five years of the NIH’s Clinical and Translational Science Awards program. More »

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DNA testing by high school students shows many teas contain unlisted ingredients

Unlisted ingredients identified by DNA barcoding technology include weeds such as annual bluegrass and herbal plants such as chamomile. Though mostly harmless, the surprise ingredients could affect a tiny minority of consumers with acute allergies. More »

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Scientists identify broad and potent HIV antibodies that mimic CD4 binding

A new approach gives researchers the ability to isolate single antibodies as well as investigate entire families of highly active antibodies against HIV.
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Cancer stem cells identified, offering new drug targets

Stem cell researchers at Rockefeller University have identified stem cells of squamous cell skin carcinoma, the second most common cancer in the world, and their molecular signature. The researchers find differences between cancer stem cells and healthy skin stem cells, which provide invaluable diagnostic marker and suggests the possibility to specifically target the root of cancer while leaving normal cells unaffected. More »

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Rockefeller alum Vanessa Ruta named to university’s faculty

Ruta, a neuroscientist interested in understanding how circuits in the brain can be modified by experience, will establish the Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior this fall.

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23 students receive Ph.D.s at Rockefeller’s 53rd commencement

The Rockefeller University will award doctoral degrees to 23 students at its commencement ceremony today, and in addition, will award honorary doctor of science degrees to two respected scholars: Richard Axel of Columbia University and Linda B. Buck of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. More »

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Scientists create humanized mouse model for hepatitis C

A team of researchers led by scientists in the Laboratory of Virology and Infectious Disease at Rockefeller have, for the first time, recreated a portion of the hepatitis C virus life cycle in a mouse with a functional immune system. The new mouse model will enable scientists to test molecules that block entry of the hepatitis C virus into cells as well as potential vaccine candidates. More »

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The Great Reversal, an increase in forest density worldwide, is under way

A new study by scientists at Rockefeller University and colleagues in the United States and Finland challenges measurements of carbon storage based on forest area alone. Several national increases of density and/or area signal the Great Reversal is under way in forests globally after centuries of loss and decline. More »

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2011 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize to be awarded to McGill University memory researcher

Brenda Milner, a pioneer in the field of cognitive neuroscience whose discoveries revolutionized the understanding of memory, will be awarded the 2011 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize from The Rockefeller University.
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Genes help worms decide where to dine

A recent study by Rockefeller University researchers identifies natural variations in several genes that help determine when and where microscopic C. elegans worms feast. The impact of the gene variants on the worms’ foraging behavior was the most significant in borderline decisions, the researchers says, when the bacteria available to eat were neither scarce nor plentiful. More »

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Marc Tessier-Lavigne to receive Sloan-Kettering Medal

Rockefeller University’s President will receive the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Medal for Outstanding Contributions to Biomedical Research at MSKCC’s 2011 Academic Convocation. More »

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Jean-Laurent Casanova honored with Belgium’s highest scientific prize

Jean-Laurent Casanova has received the 2011 InBev-Baillet Latour Health Prize, Belgium’s most important scientific prize, for his pioneering work on the identification of genes that predispose for human infectious disease. More »

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Michel C. Nussenzweig elected to National Academy of Sciences

Michel C. Nussenzweig, Sherman Fairchild Professor and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences at the Academy’s annual meeting today, in recognition of his deep contributions to our understanding of the workings of the innate and adaptive immune systems. More »

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Analysis of sperm differentiation reveals new mode of proteasome regulation

The proteasome plays a key role in the differentiation of specialized cells and in maintaining them as they age. The ability to manipulate the proteasome has already been useful in the treatment of multiple myeloma; it could help treat other cancers and degenerative disorders including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s as well. New research identifies a key protein, called DmPI31, that regulates the proteasome, which could provide researchers a handle for using it to good medical effect. “Controlled proteolysis is essential for many cell biological functions,” says Hermann Steller, head of the Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology. “There had been the impression that the proteasome is just a brute ‘shredder,’ but it doesn’t run at full steam all the time. It’s modulated, and these findings give us new ideas for designing small molecules that regulate proteasome activity.” More »

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Anti-inflammatory drugs reduce effectiveness of SSRI antidepressants

Scientists have shown that anti-inflammatory drugs, which include ibuprofen, aspirin and naproxen, reduce the effectiveness of the most widely used class of antidepressant medications, the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, often prescribed for depression and obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders. More »

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