Adjunct faculty member Kayo Inaba receives L’Oréal-UNESCO Women in Science award

Inaba, a member of Michel Nussenzweig’s Laboratory of Molecular Immunology who previously worked in Ralph Steinman’s lab, is known for her work on specialized immune cells called dendritic cells. Inaba is being honored as the Asia-Pacific recipient of the L’Oréal-UNESCO Women in Science award, which supports eminent women in science throughout the world who are working in life and physical sciences. More »

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Elaine Fuchs receives prestigious award from American Association for Cancer Research

Fuchs is being recognized with the 2014 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research for her contributions to the understanding of skin, skin stem cells and skin-related disease. Fuchs is highly regarded for her studies using reverse genetics to understand the biological basis of normal and abnormal skin development and function. The award, now in its 17th year, recognizes an individual scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic or translational cancer research. More »

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Researchers discover unusual genetic mutation linked to adolescent liver cancer

In the race for better treatments and possible cures, rare diseases are often left behind. In a collaboration of researchers at The Rockefeller University, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and the New York Genome Center, an unusual mutation has been found that is strongly linked to one such disease: a rare liver cancer that affects teens and young adults. More »

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Research shows combination of sensory signals draw mosquitoes in for a bite

Researchers used a genome editing technique to engineer a mutant version of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which spreads yellow fever. The mutant was unable to detect carbon dioxide, and studies showed that this hindered its ability to detect a host, even in the presence of other sensory cues like heat and odor. The results can help inform the design of chemical repellents to block host-seeking behavior in both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae, which spreads malaria. More »

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Sebastian Klinge awarded Sloan Research Fellowship

Klinge, who joined the faculty in September, is among 126 early-career scholars from a range of scientific disciplines to be recognized for their promise as the next generation of scientific leaders. He will receive $50,000 over two years to further his research on the structure and function of ribosomes, the cell’s protein factories. His lab is working to solve the structure of the macromolecules that catalyze key steps of ribosome creation in cells. More »

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Psoriasis researchers identify molecular changes responsible for skin discoloration

Two immune system molecules — interleukin-17 and tumor necrosis factor — are increased in psoriasis, leading the immune system to attack a person’s own skin cells. Scientists found that these molecules disrupt the pigment production of patients’ melanocytes, and are responsible for the dark spots that psoriasis leaves behind. The results could bring about new treatments for pigmentation changes in this and other skin conditions such as eczema and acne. More »

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Biostatistics approach to genetics yields new clues to roots of autism

Researchers have developed a statistical method for genetic screens that improves the classic genome-wide association screen, and, applying to autism, have uncovered genes related to the disorder that had not been suggested in previous analyses. The scientists offer evidence that beginning treatment in infants at the first symptoms could change the course of the disease, possibly preventing the permanent “pruning” of neurons, which occurs during the first two years of life, from cementing autistic symptoms in place. More »

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David Allis, pioneer in epigenetics, to receive prestigious Japan Prize

Allis’s discovery that chemical “tags” bind to specific sections of histone proteins in order to activate or silence nearby genes has ignited the field of epigenetics, a relatively new area of study which explores the inheritance of physical changes that cannot be traced back to mutations in the DNA sequence. The Japan Prize, worth approximately half a million dollars, is among the most prestigious prizes in science. More »

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New RNA interference technique finds seven genes for head and neck cancer

The technique, created by scientists in Rockefeller’s Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, attaches short pieces of RNA to highly concentrated viruses and uses ultrasound to inject the viruses into mouse embryos. It takes a fraction of the resources and much less time than using knockout mice to conduct genetic screens, and can assess about 300 genes in a single mouse in as little as five weeks. More »

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Rockefeller University establishes $25 million fund for drug discovery

The fund, to be known as the Robertson Therapeutic Development Fund in honor of a $25 million gift from the Robertson Foundation, will provide Rockefeller scientists with resources required to take exceptionally promising basic research initiatives through the steps that lead to breakthrough medications, new diagnostic tests or other clinical innovations. More »

Neuroscientist Gaby Maimon given top honor from White House for early career scientists

Maimon has been chosen by President Obama as one of 20 NIH scientists to receive the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. He is being recognized for his work linking genes to higher brain function by way of cellular electrophysiology, research that earned him the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award in 2012. More »

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Statement by Rockefeller University President Marc Tessier-Lavigne opposing academic boycotts

 

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Large-scale survey of clinical research participants shows mostly positive experiences

Although many participants gave high marks to the research teams’ trustworthiness and ability to explain their protocols, the survey also revealed that a sizable minority did not feel completely prepared for the study. The results suggest aspects of the participant experience that researchers may be able to address. More »

Michael A. Foley named director of Tri-I Therapeutics Discovery Institute

An accomplished chemist and entrepreneur with more than 25 years of industry and academic experience, Foley has been named director of a pioneering early stage drug discovery initiative formed jointly with Weill Cornell Medical College and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center formed in October. More »

Neuroscientist Winrich Freiwald awarded New York Stem Cell Foundation grant

Freiwald, who studies the neural processes that allow the brain to recognize objects and maintain attention, is is one of seven scientists who have been named Robertson Investigators and will receive $1.5 million over the next five years to expand their laboratories and train other scientists. More »

Gene is linked to deadly runaway fungal infection

Jean-Laurent Casanova, head of the Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases, and colleagues at Necker Medical School in Paris have discovered a genetic deficiency that in rare cases allows the dermatophyte fungus, which causes ringworm, to spread below the skin’s surface and onto the lymph nodes, bones, digestive tract and even the brain. More »

Rockefeller scientists among those involved in search for Higgs boson

This week’s announcement that two physicists have received the Nobel Prize in Physics for their discovery of the Higgs boson is also a victory for thousands of scientists, including several from Rockefeller, who worked to collect data and analyze results from particle collisions. More »

Neurobiologist Vanessa Ruta receives New Innovator Award to fund research on memory wiring in the brain

Ruta, head of the Laboratory of Neurophysiology and Behavior, will use the New Innovator grant, worth nearly $2.5 million over five years, to fund new technical approaches to studying the fly’s olfactory system, including devising new optical labeling techniques which will allow scientists to trace the circuits that encode a specific olfactory association. More »

Trio of New York biomedical institutions join forces to accelerate drug development

The Tri-Institutional Therapeutics Discovery Institute, Inc. is launched by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, The Rockefeller University and Weill Cornell Medical College, and a pioneering partnership is formed with Takeda Pharmaceutical Company. More »

Huda Y. Zoghbi, pediatric neurologist, to receive 2013 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

Huda Y. Zoghbi, M.D., a pediatric neurologist and neuroscientist who has worked on the genetic underpinnings of rare neurological diseases and advanced our understanding of brain disorders, has been selected to receive the tenth annual Pearl Meister Greengard Prize—one of the world’s preeminent honors recognizing outstanding achievements by women in science. More »