Specialized ‘GPCR’ proteins are the key to protecting the fly brain

New research from Rockefeller University shows that a class of molecules called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for healthy glial cells, brain cells which support, nourish and protect neurons. More »

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Rockefeller researchers receive $10 million grant to study how molecules interact within cells

The National Center for Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health announced this week that Rockefeller’s Michael P. Rout will be a recipient of a five-year, $10 million grant to study how molecules interact with one another within and between cells. More »

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Alternative to cloning technique does not yield pure clones, Rockefeller scientists report

According to new research from Rockefeller University’s Peter Mombaerts, creating mice by a two-step transfer of DNA does not reliably produce animals that are genetic duplicates of an original, and in some cases even creates “cloned” mice of the wrong sex. More »

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For sex to happen, the right receptors must align

By studying single neurons from the hypothalamus of the brain, Rockefeller scientists are beginning to show how the same hormone receptors can impact sexual behavior differently in male and female rats. The findings suggest that when it comes to controlling behavior, the brain’s genetic network can be extremely complicated. More »

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Symposium to honor Joshua Lederberg

Some of the world’s foremost scientists, statesmen and policymakers will gather at The Rockefeller University for “A Scientific Medley: Celebratory Symposium in Honor of Dr. Joshua Lederberg,” Monday, October 17, in honor of his 80th birthday. More »

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Titia de Lange receives NIH Pioneer Award

The National Insitutes of Health has selected Titia de Lange, who examines how cells respond to DNA damage, to receive up to $500,000 in direct costs per year for five years. The prestigious Pioneer Award, now in its second year, supports groundbreaking, high-risk research that, if successful, will have a significant impact. More »

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Scientists ID the genetic makeup of hair

Despite a $56 billion industry devoted to caring for and styling hair, we know surprisingly little about how it forms. A new paper from Elaine Fuchs’ laboratory at Rockefeller University begins to tease apart the genes, and the cells, that are important for its growth. More »

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Barbara O’Sullivan named hospital C.E.O.

Barbara O’Sullivan, who for the past three years has served as The Rockefeller University Hospital’s hospitalist – its chief medical doctor responsible for patient care – has been named C.E.O. of the hospital. More »

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Thomas Eisner to receive 2005 Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science

A world authority on animal behavior, ecology and evolution, Thomas Eisner, has been chosen to receive The Rockefeller University’s 2005 Lewis Thomas Prize for Writing about Science. His prize lecture, “The Ruling Class: Tales of Insect Survival,” will be on Tuesday, October 11, and is open to the public. More »

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York Avenue at 68th Street is named Mary Woodard Lasker Way

The block of York Avenue at 68th Street on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, which is adjacent to Rockefeller University’s campus, has been named in honor of the late champion of biomedical research. More »

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Clearing jams in the copy machinery

Bacteria and humans use a number of tools to direct perhaps the most important function in cells — the accurate copying of DNA during cell division. Now, Rockefeller scientists show that one of these proteins, the beta sliding clamp, serves as a toolbelt, from which the correct proteins are retrieved to enable DNA replication in the face of DNA damage. More »

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Paul Nurse to receive Copley Medal

The Royal Society has chosen Rockefeller University President Paul Nurse to receive the prestigious Copley Medal, its premiere award, for outstanding achievements in research in any branch of science. More »

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Architect selected for north campus ‘bridging’ building

An architect has been selected to design new laboratory buildings for the north end of the Rockefeller University campus, including the renovation of two existing structures and the construction of a new “bridging” building to connect them. More »

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Humanity in transition

From a population perspective, the world is at a turning point. In the September issue of Scientific American, Rockefeller’s Joel Cohen describes how the population of the coming half century will be bigger, older, and more urban than ever before, and slower-growing than that of the previous 50 years. More »

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In flies, odorant receptors work together

By tracing the location of nerve cells that produce specific odorant receptors, scientists have linked dozens of the proteins – important for detecting scents – to specific areas of the fruit fly brain. The findings suggest how the flies’ odorant receptors can work together to detect hundreds of scents despite their limited array of just 62 receptors
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New gene in Fanconi anemia “explains” hallmark chromosomal instability

Surprising findings from just five patients has led a team of international researchers, led by Rockefeller University, to the first proof of how the rare disorder Fanconi anemia causes chromosomal instability. More »

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Rockefeller researchers show evidence of asymmetric cell division in mammalian skin

By orienting cell division perpendicular to the bottom layer, cells automatically create two different daughters, one that stays in the basal layer and one that differentiates. The findings may lead to a better understanding of stem cell maintenance. More »

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Never too much of a good thing

Research from the Fuchs Lab shows that different levels of Wnt proteins are able to drive a variety of outcomes in the skin. Low levels can drive hair follicle stem cells to divide, while higher amounts cause cell differentiation. Their results may provide insight into how overstimulating skin stem cells can lead to tumors. More »

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Single stressful events bring about gradual change in brain structure

Research in rats shows that chronic, uncontrollable stress leads to gradual changes in brain structure over weeks. Yet, even a single acute stress also causes a structural change in the rat’s brain, not immediately but over days, along with higher levels of anxiety. These results may shed light on what is happening in the human brain during anxiety disorders and depressive illness. More »

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Protein destruction helps plants enter a different life stage

As a seed awakens and begins to sprout, it must make a decision: does it have everything it needs to grow, or should it wait for better conditions? The choice rests on the presence or absence of one protein, ABI3, and new research from the laboratory of Nam-Hai Chua, Ph.D., at Rockefeller University provides insight on how ABI3’s presence is controlled. More »

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