Humanity in transition

From a population perspective, the world is at a turning point. In the September issue of Scientific American, Rockefeller’s Joel Cohen describes how the population of the coming half century will be bigger, older, and more urban than ever before, and slower-growing than that of the previous 50 years. More »

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In flies, odorant receptors work together

By tracing the location of nerve cells that produce specific odorant receptors, scientists have linked dozens of the proteins – important for detecting scents – to specific areas of the fruit fly brain. The findings suggest how the flies’ odorant receptors can work together to detect hundreds of scents despite their limited array of just 62 receptors
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New gene in Fanconi anemia “explains” hallmark chromosomal instability

Surprising findings from just five patients has led a team of international researchers, led by Rockefeller University, to the first proof of how the rare disorder Fanconi anemia causes chromosomal instability. More »

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Rockefeller researchers show evidence of asymmetric cell division in mammalian skin

By orienting cell division perpendicular to the bottom layer, cells automatically create two different daughters, one that stays in the basal layer and one that differentiates. The findings may lead to a better understanding of stem cell maintenance. More »

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Never too much of a good thing

Research from the Fuchs Lab shows that different levels of Wnt proteins are able to drive a variety of outcomes in the skin. Low levels can drive hair follicle stem cells to divide, while higher amounts cause cell differentiation. Their results may provide insight into how overstimulating skin stem cells can lead to tumors. More »

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Single stressful events bring about gradual change in brain structure

Research in rats shows that chronic, uncontrollable stress leads to gradual changes in brain structure over weeks. Yet, even a single acute stress also causes a structural change in the rat’s brain, not immediately but over days, along with higher levels of anxiety. These results may shed light on what is happening in the human brain during anxiety disorders and depressive illness. More »

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Protein destruction helps plants enter a different life stage

As a seed awakens and begins to sprout, it must make a decision: does it have everything it needs to grow, or should it wait for better conditions? The choice rests on the presence or absence of one protein, ABI3, and new research from the laboratory of Nam-Hai Chua, Ph.D., at Rockefeller University provides insight on how ABI3’s presence is controlled. More »

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Size doesn’t matter

Rockefeller scientists show that microRNAs play an essential role in many development processes, including cell survival, in the fruit fly embryo. More »

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Lisa Danzig named Rockefeller University’s chief investment officer

Lisa Danzig, director of investments at Rockefeller University, has been appointed vice president and chief investment officer effective July 1, President Paul Nurse has announced. More »

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Rockefeller University vaccine researchers selected for grant from Foundation for NIH

A team of researchers led by Rockefeller University immunologist Ralph M. Steinman, M.D., has been selected for a grant offer from the Foundation for the NIH (FNIH) of $14 million to support the design of novel vaccines that stimulate multiple components of the body’s immune response, including those that have been difficult to target with existing vaccine approaches. More »

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David Rockefeller pledges $100 million to Rockefeller University

Largest gift in University’s history will support innovative science, graduate program.
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Researchers create infectious hepatitis C virus in a test tube

New system will allow scientists to study every stage of the HCV life cycle and develop drugs to treat this life-threatening disease. More »

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Worming our way into the brain

Rockefeller scientists find that studying glial cells in the roundworm C. elegans may provide insight into a variety of human brain diseases. More »

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Rockefeller University scientist elected fellow of Royal Society

Rockefeller University’s David Gadsby, Ph.D., was elected a fellow of the Royal Society for his research into how ion transporters function, and specifically for furthering our understanding of the origins of cystic fibrosis. More »

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One gene links newborn neurons with those that die in diseases such as Alzheimer’s

In certain parts of the brain, cells called neurons go through a cycle of death and replenishment. New research from Rockefeller University’s Fernando Nottebohm, Ph.D., shows that these replaceable neurons share something in common with the neurons that die in people with diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s: both have unusually low levels of a protein called UCHL1. More »

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The Starr Foundation funds tri-institution stem cell research

Three New York City biomedical research institutions — The Rockefeller University, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) — will receive $50 million over three years from The Starr Foundation to develop new resources and expertise in stem cell research. More »

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Beyond epigenetics

Rockefeller University scientists now have moved a step beyond epigenetics in describing how genetically driven activities are carried out. Working with an important molecule, called Ezh2, known to alter histones in the cell nucleus, Sasha Tarakhovsky, Ph.D., and his colleagues have discovered a new type of signaling system in the cytosol, the fluid or jelly-like substance outside of a cell’s nucleus. More »

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For young canaries learning their song, freedom in youth gives way to rules in adulthood

Young canaries can learn atypical songs but recast them into adult canary syntax as they mature, a previously undescribed aspect of vocal prowess in birds. More »

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Two Rockefeller scientists elected to National Academy of Sciences

The National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 72 new members this morning, including two Rockefeller University scientists. More »

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Vaccine developed at Rockefeller University boosts natural killer T cells in patients with cancer

A new vaccine designed at The Rockefeller University boosted a type of fast-responding immune system cell called the natural killer T (NKT) cell in patients with advanced cancer. The study surprised researchers by revealing the ability of these NKT cells to spur other, slower-responding immune cells to go to work. More »

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