Obesity researcher awarded Danone nutrition prize

The sixth Danone Institute International Prize for Nutrition, an award that honors innovative nutritional research, was given to Rockefeller University’s Jeffrey Friedman today at the European Nutrition Conference in Paris. More »

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Removing a sugar turns protective antibodies into attackers

Antibodies associated with more destructive autoimmune diseases appear to be lacking a sialic acid sugar molecule at the stem of their Y-shaped structure. More »

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Brain cells need microRNA to survive

New research from Rockefeller University shows that neurons that cannot produce microRNAs, tiny single strands of RNA that regulate the expression of genes, slowly die in a manner similar to what is seen in such human neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. More »

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Subset of dendritic cells could be used to fight infection

Despite the prevalence of the parasitic disease leishmaniasis in tropical countries, there is currently no vaccine to prevent its transmission. But a new study shows that targeting a specific set of immune cells may result in a substantial boost in immune response. More »

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Critical protein prevents damaged DNA from persisting through generations

When B lymphocytes lack the ATM protein, chromosomal breaks created during their maturation go unrepaired, and checkpoints that normally prevent the damaged cell from replicating are lost. More »

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Ion flow through membrane channels is dictated by particle size

Ion channels are small passageways that control the movement of electrically charged particles across a cell’s membrane. Now, new research reveals the thermodynamics behind how one type of ion channel determines which particles to let through. More »

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Bloomberg, Wilson receive honorary degrees at Rockefeller commencement

The Hon. Michael R. Bloomberg, mayor of the City of New York, and Edward O. Wilson, an evolutionary biologist and naturalist, received honorary doctor of science degrees at Rockefeller University’s 49th Convocation for Conferring Degrees. More »

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Protein is linked to functional development of brain neurons

Rockefeller University investigators say that a molecule that helps transport cargo inside nerve cells may have another, critically important, role related to how developing neurons sprout the projections that relay electrical signals within the brain. More »

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Dendritic cells are replenished from blood

New research helps resolve an ongoing debate about where dendritic cells, which help direct the body’s immune responses, originate and how they multiply, especially in the spleen and lymph system. The findings are especially important for scientists developing immune-cell-targeted vaccines. More »

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Study of staph reveals how bacteria evolve resistance

By studying blood taken from a single patient over a period of months, Rockefeller University researchers have been able to trace how a common strain of bacteria adapted its genes to counteract the antibiotics used to try to kill it. More »

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Torsten Wiesel receives National Medal of Science

Rockefeller University President Emeritus Torsten N. Wiesel, who shared the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, is a recipient of the 2005 National Medal of Science. More »

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Left-right wiring determined by neural communication in the embryonic worm

Although most animals appear symmetrical at first glance, they hide a glut of internal asymmetries. The roundworm C. elegans has nerves on its left and right sides that perform different functions, and which nerve runs down which side seems random from worm to worm. New research shows that the system responsible for establishing the arbitrary left-right configuration is an embryonic network of gap junctions that dissolve as the worm develops. More »

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Single circadian clock regulates flies’ response to light and temperature

Circadian rhythms allow animals to align their bodies to the earth’s rotation. Now, new research shows that the same molecular clock that flies use to sync themselves to the sun’s patterns is what allows them to sync to temperature patterns, too. More »

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De Lange, Nussenzweig elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Rockefeller University faculty will become members of the independent policy and research center devoted to studying complex emerging problems. More »

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Libchaber and Young elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two Rockefeller scientists are among 72 new members and 18 foreign associates from 12 countries who were chosen for distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. More »

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Richard Dawkins accepts 2006 Lewis Thomas Prize

Best known for promoting the gene-centered view of evolution in his 1976 bestseller The Selfish Gene, Dawkins is critically regarded for his ability to convey large, universal theories by use of detailed examples taken from a lifetime of observation of the natural world. More »

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Mice on Prozac help scientists find better depression treatments

By comparing mice that had been given Prozac with mice given an alternate drug, researchers have identified a new class of chemicals that could offer better control over serotonin and more effective treatments for the debilitating mental illness. More »

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Jeffrey Ravetch to receive William B. Coley Award

The Cancer Research Institute, which administers the annual prize to a scientist studying basic and tumor immunology, chose Ravetch for his work on Fc receptors, which has led to fundamental discoveries critical to the design of therapeutic antibodies. More »

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New study reveals inner workings of a molecular clamp critical to DNA replication

The process by which DNA is copied, an essential biological function which occurs millions of times a day in an average mammal, is driven by three core protein complexes. New research from Rockefeller University now shows that one of these complexes, a “clamp loader,” requires several previously unidentified steps to get the process started. More »

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David Allis to receive Gairdner Award

Allis, who studies DNA-packaging proteins called histones, is one of five scientists to be honored by the Gairdner Foundation for “fundamental discoveries that will have impact on human genetic development, cancer and other diseases.” More »

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