Researchers Propose New Model of Drug Resistance in Staph Bacteria

Researchers at The Rockefeller University have established a new model to explain how the infectious “staph” bacterium evades several widely used antibiotics. They show that a protein previously thought to play no role in drug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is, in fact, essential. More »

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Researchers Trace the Origin of a Widespread Antibiotic-Resistant “Superbug”

One of the most widely disseminated strains of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium responsible for hundreds of infections in European hospitals can be traced back to the 1950s, according to researchers at The Rockefeller University. Using the molecular tool called DNA fingerprinting, they have shown that this persistent lineage of Staphylococcus aureus is an expert at acquiring resistance to antibiotics. More »

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Researchers’ Mathematical Model Provides Chagas Disease Insight

By characterizing the discrete population dynamics of an individual household, and by collecting data for many individual households to serve as an empirical base, a Rockefeller University researcher and his Argentinean colleague have identified improved control tactics for a vexing public health problem. More »

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Rockefeller Heart Disease Study Seeks Patients

A new study at The Rockefeller University Hospital will assess the potential of a fatty acid found in fish to reduce heart attack risk. The researchers are testing the hypothesis that a daily dose of the omega-3 fatty acid known as DHA will positively alter heart disease risk factors in at-risk individuals, specifically overweight and obese people. Participants who meet certain weight and health criteria are currently being enrolled in the clinical trial. More »

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Leptin “Replacement Therapy” Study in Obese Women Begins

The weight-regulating hormone leptin will be given to obese women in a new study at The Rockefeller University Hospital in New York City to test the effects of the treatment on weight loss. More »

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Researchers Use Cloning Technology to Produce Embryonic Stem Cell Lines from Adult Mice

Embryonic stem cells can be derived from benign biopsies of adult mice and can become neurons and germ cells, report researchers from The Rockefeller University and Sloan-Kettering Institute in the April 27 issue of Science. The findings hint that perhaps any cell might be a source for therapeutic applications. More »

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Friedman, Kuriyan and Steinman elected to National Academy of Sciences

The National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 72 new members this morning. Among these are three members of The Rockefeller University faculty. More »

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Diabetes Researchers Find that a Regulator of Insulin Also Regulates Cholesterol Levels

Researchers in Markus Stoffel’s laboratory of Metabolic Diseases have found that that a transcription factor called TCF1 not only regulates insulin production in the pancreas but also controls the regulation of cholesterol. In a paper published in the April issue of Nature Genetics, Stoffel’s team shows that when TRF1 doesn’t function properly, both diabetes and high cholesterol result. More »

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Rockefeller Researchers Identify Defense System in Plants

Researchers at The Rockefeller University have discovered that an experimental plant may harbor an additional line of defense against drought, once it has left the safety of its seed. The work suggests that a well-known plant hormone delays the growth of newly sprouted plants in order to give them one last chance to monitor their environment for signs of dryness before initiating growth. Furthermore, they have identified a specific protein as a key player in the process. More »

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Researchers Light the Path of Brain’s Feeding Circuit in Mice

A novel technique that uses a virus tagged with a green-glowing jellyfish protein has enabled scientists to visualize the feeding circuit in mice. The method may be useful in studies of other complex circuits in the brain. The findings are reported in the March 30 issue of Science by a team of researchers from The Rockefeller University, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Princeton University and the University of California at San Diego. More »

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Researchers Discover Promoter of Nerve Tissue in Frogs

Researchers at The Rockefeller University have discovered that a protein known to be involved in the early development of embryos indirectly leads to the formation of nerve tissue in frogs. The findings, reported in the March 22 issue of Nature, may have applications in such neurodegenerative diseases as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. More »

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Researchers Find Novel Way to Kill Streptococci Bacteria

Researchers at The Rockefeller University have discovered a powerful new way to destroy on contact the bacteria that cause strep throat, flesh-eating disease and a variety of other infections. The technique, which may not cause the bacteria to evolve resistant strains as antibiotics do, also could have applications for many other bacterial diseases. The findings are reported in the March 20 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Early Edition Issue No. 12). More »

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Researchers Identify an Enzyme That Regulates the Action of Chronic Cocaine

Scientists have found that an enzyme called Cdk5 regulates the action of chronic cocaine in the brain. In a paper published in the March Nature, members of Paul Greengard’s Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience and colleagues at other institutions identify Cdk5′s role in the long-term changes associated with cocaine addiction. By combining behavioral and biochemical studies, they found that Cdk5 (which stands for cyclin-dependent kinase 5) is a key player in a series of biochemical events that occur in certain brain cells with exposure to chronic cocaine. More »

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Rockefeller University President Arnold Levine Receives First Albany Medical Center Prize

Arnold J. Levine, Ph.D., president of The Rockefeller University, is the first recipient of the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. Levine is recognized for his discovery of the p53 tumor suppressor protein, one of the body’s most important defenses against many forms of cancer. More »

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Many Immune Cells Are Fine-tuned to Prevent “Friendly Fire”

About one-quarter of the body’s antibodies are produced by immune cells that have had their genetic code revised during a halt in their development, scientists at Rockefeller University and three other institutions have found. The study is the first to show that this phenomenon, called “receptor editing,” plays a major role in the creation of the body’s huge antibody array. More »

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Rockefeller and Aaron Diamond Researcher David D. Ho Receives Presidential Citizens Medal

Rockefeller University Professor David D. Ho, M.D., scientific director of the Aaron Diamond AIDS Research Center (ADARC), will receive the Presidential Citizens Medal from President Clinton today in a ceremony at the White House. Ho is one of 28 recipients being recognized for “remarkable service and accomplishments” in a variety of areas. More »

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Researchers Identify Key to Genetic Replication in Hepatitis C Virus

Researchers at Rockefeller University and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified mutations in a protein of certain strains of hepatitis C virus (HCV) that allow these strains to replicate more vigorously in human cell culture. The finding allows scientists to improve an essential tool for studying the virus and suggests a starting point for the design of effective vaccines. More »

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Researchers find how leprosy bacterium selects and attacks nerves

Researchers at Rockefeller University who study the bacterium that causes leprosy say they have identified a component on the microbe’s surface that allows it to specifically select and attack the peripheral nerves. The finding clarifies how the bacterium, Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) precisely seeks out peripheral nerves, and it sheds light on the early stages of nerve damage in other neurodegenerative diseases such as Guillain-Barre syndrome and multiple sclerosis. More »

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Researchers Identify Molecule That Senses Osmotic Pressure in Vertebrates

Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Rockefeller University have identified a molecule in vertebrates that senses osmotic pressure-the measure of saltiness essential for living cells-and may provide an inroad into understanding inner ear function and the sense of touch. More »

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Rockefeller University Computational Biologist Receives Presidential Early Career Award

Theresa Gaasterland, Ph.D., a computational biologist at The Rockefeller University, was one of 20 National Science Foundation-supported researchers named by President Clinton as recipients of the fifth annual Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. The awards were presented yesterday at the White House Old Executive Office Building by the president’s science advisor, Neal Lane. More »

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