McEwen to receive Pasarow Award

Rockefeller University’s Bruce McEwen, whose laboratory studies how the brain changes in response to stress and other experiences, will receive the 2005 Neuropsychiatry Research Award from the Robert J. and Claire Pasarow Foundation. More »

Tags: ,

Researchers uncover a pathway linked to autoimmune disease

In a series of discoveries that has the potential to help researchers halt autoimmune disorders — such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis — a Rockefeller University scientist has found an underlying mechanism that begins to explain the pathologies of a number of immune diseases. More »

Tags: ,

Lizard’s ‘third eye’ sheds light on how vision evolved

A primitive third eye found in many types of lizards, used to detect changes in light and dark and to regulate the production of certain hormones, may help explain how vision evolved and how signals are transmitted from the eyes to the brain. Now, new experiments show that the molecular mechanisms that underlie this parietal eye’s responses to light are similar to those that transmit responses from rod and cone cells in the eye to the brain. More »

Tags: , ,

Researchers show laboratory hepatitis C strain is also infections in animal models

For many years scientists have struggled with an inability to efficiently culture the hepatitis C virus in the laboratory. Now, researchers at Rockefeller University have overcome several obstacles and successfully shown that a strain of HCV they created in the laboratory, which can efficiently be cultured in vitro, is also infectious in animals. More »

Tags: ,

Paul Nurse to co-host Charlie Rose on avian flu

Rockefeller President Paul Nurse will make his second appearance on Charlie Rose tonight, when he co-hosts, with Rose, an hour-long discussion on the threat of avian flu. The show, which is to be the first in a series of science-themed Charlie Rose shows co-hosted with Nurse, will air on PBS television stations nationwide. More »

Tags: ,

When mice choose mates, experience counts

In a series of experiments designed to help scientists understand the brain chemicals that guide mate selection, Rockefeller scientists exposed female mice to the odor of either a male mouse alone or a male mouse with a female. The females consistently preferred the scent of males linked to other females. More »

Tags: ,

Developing neurons reverse direction in absence of Wnt protein

Despite years of study, scientists don’t fully understand how the body routes information among the brain’s 10 billion neurons. Now, Rockefeller University scientists have discovered that proteins in the ubiquitous Wnt family are vital for charting nerve growth and direction of information flow along a neuron. In fact, the absence of certain Wnt proteins in worms can alter a nerve so substantially that it grows in reverse. More »

Tags: ,

Aggravated assault: How adhesion proteins regulate skin inflammation

While strong links between skin cells form a tight barrier that protects the body from the world outside, new research from Rockefeller University shows that the proteins that create these bonds are also key components of a pathway that prevents rampant inflammation. More »

Tags: ,

Structural study shows how bacteria select their most virulent proteins

A diverse group of bacteria all rely on the same syringe-like system to infect their hosts. Rockefeller researchers have now uncovered a structural similarity shared by many of these virulent pathogens that may help direct future antibiotic research. More »

Tags: , ,

By targeting dendritic cells, HIV and malarial vaccines outperform competitors

Although DNA-based vaccines are often in the limelight, scientists at Rockefeller University are developing a completely different approach to inducing immunity, one that directs a vaccine straight to the immune cells of living animals and, eventually, humans. More »

Tags: , , ,

Rockefeller neurobiologist to receive Benjamin Franklin Medal

Rockefeller University’s Fernando Nottebohm will receive the 2006 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Life Science, The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia announced today. The medal recognizes Nottebohm’s discovery of neuronal replacement in the adult vertebrate brain and the elaboration of the mechanism and choreography of this phenomenon. More »

Tags: ,

MicroRNAs linked to mammalian skin development

Since their discovery, microRNAs have been shown to play a role in the development of many organisms, but not mammals. This week, Rockefeller scientists announce that they have found and characterized over one hundred microRNAs in the outer layer and hair follicles of mouse skin. These microRNAs, tiny chunks of RNA that bind to longer segments in order to turn off the production of proteins, are key to the mice’s ability to develop hair follicles and oil glands, the scientists say. More »

Tags: , ,

Genetic ‘stress response’ may explain how bacteria resist drugs

Bacteria have a nasty habit of developing resistance to even our most powerful pharmaceuticals. But by tracking the staph infection of a single patient during a course of antibiotic treatment, Rockefeller University scientists have discovered new clues to how bacteria evolve resistance. More »

Tags: , , ,

Modular structure enables TRCF protein to both halt transcription and repair DNA

Using x-ray crystallography, Rockefeller scientists have now solved the structure of a protein — called Transcription-Repair Coupling Factor or TRCF — that plays a dual role in DNA transcription repair. The results show that TRCF employs a modular structure which would allow for conformational changes so that TRCF’s recruitment of the repair machinery doesn’t interfere with its interruption of transcription. More »

Tags: , , ,

Damaged tumor suppressor plays major role in lymphoma development

Scientists have known for years that chromosomal translocations — abnormalities in which a piece of one chromosome breaks off and fuses to another — lead to a type of blood cancer called lymphoma, but little was known about how cells accumulate translocations or defend themselves against them. Now, Rockefeller researchers say a malfunction in tumor suppressor proteins like p53 or p19 result in the development of translocations induced by AID, a “genome destroyer” that initiates DNA damage. More »

Tags: ,

PLD1 protein is implicated in Alzheimer’s brain damage

Most current Alzheimer’s drugs target molecules responsible for memory formation but don’t address the root of the problem: plaques that build amid brain cells, causing them to weaken and die. Rockefeller scientists now say that a protein called PLD1 is closely linked to the pathways through which these plaques develop, and may be a target for new drugs that better treat Alzheimer’s. More »

Tags: , ,

Genetic studies in mice yield clues to how heart disease is inherited

Heart disease tends to run in families, and scientists have long known that genetics play an important role. Now, new research in mice, from the laboratory of Rockefeller’s Jan L. Breslow, shows that the genetics of heart disease are more complicated than previously thought. More »

Tags: ,

Newly discovered immune cell partially responsible for psoriasis

In a discovery that may help shape new treatments for psoriasis, scientists at Rockefeller University have found a new type of immune cell that may be critical in producing inflammation and tissue damage in the skin. More »

Tags: , ,

‘Geneless’ enzyme is key to how bacteria intack

To infect, bacteria must first stick. New research from Rockefeller’s Fischetti Lab has identified an enzyme essential to how proteins on the surface of staph and strep bacteria stick to the tissues of their hosts. The scientists say their discovery could lead to drugs that prevent some of our most dangerous bacteria from gaining a foothold. More »

Tags: , ,

For insect cells, like mouse cells, one protein decides between life and death

Cells are given life by mitochondria, an organelle that provides them with all the energy they need. But while mitochondria giveth, they also taketh away — when a cell’s time is up, they release molecules that start a cascade ending in death. At least that’s how it works in humans, mice and other vertebrates. And now, new research from Rockefeller University’s Hermann Steller shows for the first time that the molecules and events that trigger cell death in invertebrates can also start in the mitochondria. More »

Tags: ,