New report bolsters theory on ear’s inner amplifier

Two competing theories exist to explain how the human ear amplifies sound. Now, using ear hair cells from a bullfrog, scientists at Rockefeller provide evidence to bolster the theory they proposed in 1998. More »

Tags: , ,

Reversing sugar’s effect on the brain

New research on diabetes shows that the brain’s memory center is one target of uncontrolled high blood sugar — and that the effects on it may be reversible. More »

Tags: ,

Scientists teach worms to learn

Worms, like people, tend to avoid foods that have made them sick in the past. By coaxing worms to select only healthy choices from a menu of bacteria, Rockefeller scientists show that one brain chemical, serotonin, helps cement behavior. More »

Tags:

Application deadline for faculty search is next week

Scientists interested in tenure-track faculty positions in the biological and biomedical sciences at The Rockefeller University must submit applications by Nov. 15. More »

Tags:

Bruce McEwen awarded Goldman-Rakic Prize

Rockefeller University’s Bruce McEwen has received the Goldman-Rakic Prize for Cognitive Neuroscience for his studies on environmentally regulated gene expression in the brain, which has contributed to an understanding of stress and stress hormones in a range of disorders, including depression and post-traumatic stress. More »

Tags: ,

Protecting the brain from overactivity

Alzheimer’s disease, depression and epilepsy all share a problem with a single brain chemical: glutamate. New research from Rockefeller University shows how the brain uses a specific protein, neuropeptide Y, to protect itself from glutamate damage. More »

Tags: ,

Immunologist Philippa Marrack to receive Rockefeller University’s Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

The second annual Pearl Meister Greengard Prize, a major international prize awarded by The Rockefeller University, will be presented to immunologist Philippa Marrack on November 10. The prize, which was established by Rockefeller University Professor and Nobel laureate Paul Greengard in 2004, honors a female scientist who has made exceptional contributions to biomedical science. More »

Tags: ,

Margaret Hamburg elected to Rockefeller Board of Trustees

Rockefeller University’s Trustees have elected Margaret Hamburg, M.D., a former New York City Health Commissioner, to serve on the university’s Board. More »

Tags:

Bacteria build walls to withstand antibiotics

Antibiotic resistant bacteria, which are proliferating in hospitals and causing major headaches for physicians, cheat death by finding ways to fortify their cell walls against the deadly drugs. Now, new research from the laboratory of Rockefeller’s Alexander Tomasz shows that one gene, called mecA, enables them to this. More »

Tags: ,

High blood pressure linked to gene regulation

Genes, as much as treadmills and salads, dictate blood pressure. But new research from Rockefeller University suggests that even the tiniest changes to our DNA can create a predisposition to hypertension. More »

Tags: ,

Jeffrey Friedman elected to Institute of Medicine

Rockefeller University’s Jeffrey M. Friedman, a molecular geneticist whose discovery of the hormone leptin and its role in regulating body weight has changed our understanding of the causes of human obesity, was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, it was announced today. More »

Tags: ,

Torsten Wiesel receives Rall Medal for human rights work

Rockefeller University President Emeritus Torsten Wiesel received the Institute of Medicine’s David Rall Medal, it was announced today. The medal is awarded annually to an IOM member who has demonstrated particularly distinguished leadership as chair of a study committee or other activity, showing commitment above and beyond the usual responsibilities of the position. More »

Tags: ,

Scientists warn nuclear catastrophe is ‘an imminent danger’

Rockefeller’s Joshua Lederberg joins former defense secretary William Perry to urge that more attention be given to the threat of a terrorist-sponsored nuclear attack. More »

Tags: ,

A single protein is crucial to memory formation, scientists show

New findings show that a single protein called Nova is responsible for regulating the quality of the information that is processed in the spaces between brain cells. More »

Tags: ,

Specialized ‘GPCR’ proteins are the key to protecting the fly brain

New research from Rockefeller University shows that a class of molecules called G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is essential for healthy glial cells, brain cells which support, nourish and protect neurons. More »

Tags: , ,

Rockefeller researchers receive $10 million grant to study how molecules interact within cells

The National Center for Research Resources at the National Institutes of Health announced this week that Rockefeller’s Michael P. Rout will be a recipient of a five-year, $10 million grant to study how molecules interact with one another within and between cells. More »

Tags: , ,

Alternative to cloning technique does not yield pure clones, Rockefeller scientists report

According to new research from Rockefeller University’s Peter Mombaerts, creating mice by a two-step transfer of DNA does not reliably produce animals that are genetic duplicates of an original, and in some cases even creates “cloned” mice of the wrong sex. More »

Tags: ,

For sex to happen, the right receptors must align

By studying single neurons from the hypothalamus of the brain, Rockefeller scientists are beginning to show how the same hormone receptors can impact sexual behavior differently in male and female rats. The findings suggest that when it comes to controlling behavior, the brain’s genetic network can be extremely complicated. More »

Tags: , ,

Symposium to honor Joshua Lederberg

Some of the world’s foremost scientists, statesmen and policymakers will gather at The Rockefeller University for “A Scientific Medley: Celebratory Symposium in Honor of Dr. Joshua Lederberg,” Monday, October 17, in honor of his 80th birthday. More »

Tags:

Titia de Lange receives NIH Pioneer Award

The National Insitutes of Health has selected Titia de Lange, who examines how cells respond to DNA damage, to receive up to $500,000 in direct costs per year for five years. The prestigious Pioneer Award, now in its second year, supports groundbreaking, high-risk research that, if successful, will have a significant impact. More »

Tags: , ,