Researchers Identify Molecule That Senses Osmotic Pressure in Vertebrates

Researchers at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Rockefeller University have identified a molecule in vertebrates that senses osmotic pressure-the measure of saltiness essential for living cells-and may provide an inroad into understanding inner ear function and the sense of touch. More »

Tags: , ,

Rockefeller University Computational Biologist Receives Presidential Early Career Award

Theresa Gaasterland, Ph.D., a computational biologist at The Rockefeller University, was one of 20 National Science Foundation-supported researchers named by President Clinton as recipients of the fifth annual Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers. The awards were presented yesterday at the White House Old Executive Office Building by the president’s science advisor, Neal Lane. More »

Tags: ,

Rockefeller University Neurobiologist Paul Greengard wins 2000 Nobel Prize in Medicine, Shares Award with Arvid Carlsson and Eric Kandel

Second Consecutive Medicine Prize Awarded to a Rockefeller University Scientist

Paul Greengard, Ph.D., Vincent Astor Professor and head of the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience at The Rockefeller University, has won the 2000 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of how dopamine and a number of other transmitters in the brain exert their action in the nervous system. Last year’s Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to Rockefeller University’s G¸nter Blobel, M.D., Ph.D., John D. Rockefeller Jr. Professor and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. More »

Tags: ,

Five New York City Research Institutions Collaborate to Study 3-D Structures of Proteins

The National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), part of the U.S. government’s National Institutes of Health, awarded the New York Structural Genomics Research Consortium (NYSGRC) $4.5 million to develop high-speed methods to decipher the three-dimensional structures of proteins. The award will fund the first year of a five year pilot program launched by NIGMS called the Protein Structure Initiative More »

Tags:

Scientists Discover Why Experimental Leukemia Drug, STI-571, is Effective

A drug called STI-571, now being tested in clinics to treat a rare form of leukemia, selectively blocks a mutant enzyme that causes the disease without harming its molecular cousins. Reporting in the Sept. 15 issue of Science, a team of researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the State University of New York at Stony Brook has shown how STI-571 accomplishes this feat, suggesting new avenues for the structure-based design of cancer drugs with reduced side effects. More »

Tags: , , ,

Researchers Identify Candidate Human Pheromone Receptor Gene

A team of researchers from The Rockefeller University in New York and the Yale University School of Medicine has identified for the first time a candidate pheromone receptor gene in humans. The findings, reported in the September issue of Nature Genetics, may shed new light on the molecular basis of social communication between humans. More »

Tags: ,

Researchers Find Key to Tuberculosis Persistence in the Body

The tuberculosis bacterium requires a specific enzyme to cause persistent infection, a consortium of researchers at Rockefeller University and three other institutions have found. The discovery suggests that targeting the enzyme could improve therapies for TB, which claims more lives each year than any other bacterial infection. More »

Tags: , ,

Rockefeller University Professor Emeritus, Dr. Abraham Pais, Dies at 82

Professor Emeritus, Dr. Abraham Pais, died Friday evening in Copenhagen. A theoretical physicist of international renown, Dr. Pais became a member of the faculty in 1963, when the university was still known as The Rockefeller Institute.

Click on the link to read the New York Times article on Dr. Pais. (Registration is required.) More »

Tags:

Three Leading New York Institutions Announce $160 Million Joint Investment in Biological Research

Three of New York’s leading research institutions announced the creation of a $160 million collaborative program in basic biological research sparked by a private donor who will contribute half the total investment.

The collaboration among Cornell University, its Weill Medical College, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and The Rockefeller University will include the joint recruitment of a dozen new faculty members, reflecting the level of investment demanded by the technological demands of science today. More »

Tags:

Rockefeller University Dedicates Peggy Rockefeller Plaza

The Rockefeller University community dedicated Peggy Rockefeller Plaza at the south end of its campus today in a ceremony that included music from a brass band, remarks from donors Anne and Robert Bass, and a surprise announcement. More »

Tags:

Rockefeller Researcher Jan Breslow Receives Bristol-Myers Squibb Award For Distinguished Achievement In Cardiovascular Research

Jan Breslow, M.D., head of the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism at The Rockefeller University, has been selected to receive the 2000 Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Achievement in Cardiovascular Research. Breslow is one of seven researchers in various medical research fields to receive the award in 2000. More »

Tags: ,

Rockefeller Researchers Show Brain Wiring For Detecting Odors May Depend On Experience

Findings show for the first time that development of smell is similar to other senses.

Scientists have known for 30 years that proper development of the area of the brain responsible for processing visual signals depends on stimulation from the environment. In other words, the brain must “use it or lose it.” Now researchers fromThe Rockefeller University have shown a similar paradigm in the development of the brain’s wiring for odor detection in mice. More »

Tags: , ,

First Hepatitis-C Center in Northeast Region Established By Rockefeller University, New York-Presbyterian, and Weill Cornell

New York, NY–Three neighboring New York City medical institutions–The Rockefeller University, NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, and Weill Medical College of Cornell University–have jointly established the Center for the Study of Hepatitis C, the first major center in the Northeast region devoted specifically to the disease. Renowned virologist Charles M. Rice, Ph.D., who recently made the first infectious clone of the virus, will join The Rockefeller University faculty and serve as both scientific and executive director of the multi-institutional center. More »

Tags: , ,

Roderick MacKinnon elected to U.S. National Academy of Sciences

Professor Roderick MacKinnon, head of the Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology and Biophysics and an investigator at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, was elected to membership in the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) at the Academy’s 137th meeting on Tues., May 2. MacKinnon studies the functional and structural architecture of ion channel proteins, molecules that govern the electrical potential of membranes throughout nature, thereby generating nerve impulses and controlling muscle contraction, cardiac rhythm and hormone secretion. More »

Tags: ,

Rockefeller Researchers Identify Novel Penicillin-resistance Gene in Pneumonia Bacteria

Penicillin resistance of the bacterium that causes pneumonia, the pneumococcus, is a growing global health problem. Although S. pneumoniae was once considered to be routinely susceptible to penicillin, since the mid-1980s the incidence of resistance of this organism to penicillin and other antimicrobial agents has been increasing in the United States and throughout the world. Now, researchers at The Rockefeller University, reporting in the April 25 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that resistance can be stopped by inactivating a pair of genes responsible for producing molecules called branched muropeptides, the availability of which appears to be essential for the bacterium to survive in the presence of penicillin. The finding suggests that the branched peptides may be a new drug target for fighting penicillin-resistant bacteria. More »

Tags: , , ,

Chipping Away at Leptin’s Effects

Rockefeller researchers are using genechip technology, a powerful tool for analyzing the expression patterns of thousands of genes at a time. Researchers in the Friedman lab have identified a number of genes that are specifically regulated by the hormone leptin. More »

Tags:

NIH And Rockefeller Researchers Find That Gene Acts As “Caretaker” To Genome

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health and Rockefeller University have found that a gene known for repairing breaks in the double strands of DNA also acts as a “caretaker” that prevents chromosome segments from rearranging. Recognizing this additional role for the gene, called Ku80, could increase ways of targeting some tumors that develop when the gene is mutated. More »

Tags: ,

Rockefeller researchers characterize yeast nuclear pore complex

Researchers from The Rockefeller University and the University of Alberta in Canada have obtained the first comprehensive inventory of the protein components of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), an essential cellular structure that regulates transport between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. More »

Tags: ,

Science Outreach H.S. student in top 10 of Intel Science Talent Search

Science Outreach student Eugene Simuni was awarded a $25,000 scholarship for his fifth-place win in the Intel Science Talent Search. A senior at Midwood High School, Simuni was mentored by Ethan Marin, of the Sakmar lab. His project explored protein transmission of visual signals to the brain. Simuni was also chosen by his fellow finalists to receive the Glenn T. Seaborg Award for his commitment to scientific cooperation and communication. More »

Tags: , , ,

Bard College And Rockefeller University Establish New Collaborative Programs In Science Education

Bard College and The Rockefeller University have established a new, ongoing collaborative program in science education, Rockefeller President Arnold Levine and Bard President Leon Botstein announced today. More »

Tags: , ,