More Studies Shed Light on How Prozac Works

Nobel laureate Paul Greengard, Ph.D., and other Rockefeller University scientists have illuminated, in laboratory mice, new details of the complex chemical interaction in the brain that is generated by Prozac, the widely prescribed drug for depression. More »

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Cells on the Verge of Suicide

A developing cell in the human body sits on the edge of death. Proteins called Grim, Reaper and Hid stand poised, ready to unleash other toxic proteins. Only if a protein messenger from another cell arrives in time to call off the killing, will the cell then mature into any one of the various types of body cells, such as skin, liver and brain. More »

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Tidying Up Transcription Factors

Fifty years ago, in the early days of biology, so little was known about the cell that all of the proteins outside of its nucleus were grouped into one big “cytoplasmic soup.” Now, as the list of known cellular ingredients continues to expand beyond the capacity of any recipe card, two Rockefeller University scientists are taking a step back to ask whether there might be a better way to organize the current thinking about a particularly important class of proteins inherent to all living cells. More »

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Pioneering Genome Analysis Reveals the Genes Responsible for Pheromonal Communication Among Rodents

Rockefeller University scientists report that the way mice communicate with each other is far more complex — and has a more elaborate evolutionary history — than imagined. More »

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Another Transmembrane Protein Structure Solved by Rockefeller Scientists

“Why did nature come up with such a structural plan?” ask Rockefeller University professor Roderick MacKinnon and colleagues in their Jan. 17 Nature cover article describing the three-dimensional structure of a type of chloride channel called the ClC. More »

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Malignant Cells Survive-and Replicate-Because Cancer-causing Molecule Jams Normal p53 Cell-suicide Trigger

A cancer-causing molecule called WISP-1 may explain why some people with cancer do not benefit from chemotherapy while others with the same form of cancer respond to the treatment, according to researchers at The Rockefeller University. The findings, reported in the Jan. 1 issue of Genes and Development, suggest that drugs designed to block WISP-1 may increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy in colon cancer and perhaps other cancers. More »

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Novel Method To Fight Drug-resistant Infections Emerges from Lab – and Nature

Scientists have turned to nature once again for help in fighting deadly infections. Reporting in the Dec. 7 issue of Science, Rockefeller University researchers show that a natural enzyme derived from tiny viruses that live inside bacteria can successfully target and kill disease bacteria, including those that are resistant to drugs. More »

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Researchers Uncover Molecular Basis of Second Leading Cause of Mental Retardation

Scientists at last may have determined how mental retardation develops in people with fragile X syndrome, a condition caused by the inherited loss of an essential protein, termed the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). The new research demonstrates that FMRP controls the fate of several specific proteins in brain cells and thus may explain why the absence of this single protein can cause the range of physical, cognitive and behavioral abnormalities characteristic of fragile X syndrome. More »

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M.D.-Ph.D. Training Program for Minority Students Receives $500,000 Grant

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has pledged a $500,000 challenge grant over the next three years to help create a $1 million endowment for the Gateways to the Laboratory Program. Gateways is a 10-week summer training program that enables talented freshman and sophomore college students from minority and disadvantaged populations to gain the skills necessary for admission to-and success in-M.D.-Ph.D. programs More »

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Rockefeller Researchers Discover Possible Trigger for “Killer T Cells” To Attack

How do “killer T cells” know when to attack virus-infected and cancerous cells, and when to retreat? The answer possibly has been provided by Rockefeller University research to be published in the Nov. issue of Nature Immunology. More »

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Researchers Propose New Model of Drug Resistance in Staph Bacteria

Researchers at The Rockefeller University have established a new model to explain how the infectious “staph” bacterium evades several widely used antibiotics. They show that a protein previously thought to play no role in drug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus is, in fact, essential. More »

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Researchers Trace the Origin of a Widespread Antibiotic-Resistant “Superbug”

One of the most widely disseminated strains of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium responsible for hundreds of infections in European hospitals can be traced back to the 1950s, according to researchers at The Rockefeller University. Using the molecular tool called DNA fingerprinting, they have shown that this persistent lineage of Staphylococcus aureus is an expert at acquiring resistance to antibiotics. More »

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Researchers’ Mathematical Model Provides Chagas Disease Insight

By characterizing the discrete population dynamics of an individual household, and by collecting data for many individual households to serve as an empirical base, a Rockefeller University researcher and his Argentinean colleague have identified improved control tactics for a vexing public health problem. More »

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Rockefeller Heart Disease Study Seeks Patients

A new study at The Rockefeller University Hospital will assess the potential of a fatty acid found in fish to reduce heart attack risk. The researchers are testing the hypothesis that a daily dose of the omega-3 fatty acid known as DHA will positively alter heart disease risk factors in at-risk individuals, specifically overweight and obese people. Participants who meet certain weight and health criteria are currently being enrolled in the clinical trial. More »

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Leptin “Replacement Therapy” Study in Obese Women Begins

The weight-regulating hormone leptin will be given to obese women in a new study at The Rockefeller University Hospital in New York City to test the effects of the treatment on weight loss. More »

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Researchers Use Cloning Technology to Produce Embryonic Stem Cell Lines from Adult Mice

Embryonic stem cells can be derived from benign biopsies of adult mice and can become neurons and germ cells, report researchers from The Rockefeller University and Sloan-Kettering Institute in the April 27 issue of Science. The findings hint that perhaps any cell might be a source for therapeutic applications. More »

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Friedman, Kuriyan and Steinman elected to National Academy of Sciences

The National Academy of Sciences announced the election of 72 new members this morning. Among these are three members of The Rockefeller University faculty. More »

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Diabetes Researchers Find that a Regulator of Insulin Also Regulates Cholesterol Levels

Researchers in Markus Stoffel’s laboratory of Metabolic Diseases have found that that a transcription factor called TCF1 not only regulates insulin production in the pancreas but also controls the regulation of cholesterol. In a paper published in the April issue of Nature Genetics, Stoffel’s team shows that when TRF1 doesn’t function properly, both diabetes and high cholesterol result. More »

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Rockefeller Researchers Identify Defense System in Plants

Researchers at The Rockefeller University have discovered that an experimental plant may harbor an additional line of defense against drought, once it has left the safety of its seed. The work suggests that a well-known plant hormone delays the growth of newly sprouted plants in order to give them one last chance to monitor their environment for signs of dryness before initiating growth. Furthermore, they have identified a specific protein as a key player in the process. More »

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Researchers Light the Path of Brain’s Feeding Circuit in Mice

A novel technique that uses a virus tagged with a green-glowing jellyfish protein has enabled scientists to visualize the feeding circuit in mice. The method may be useful in studies of other complex circuits in the brain. The findings are reported in the March 30 issue of Science by a team of researchers from The Rockefeller University, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Princeton University and the University of California at San Diego. More »

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