Hunt for Early Heart Attack Genes Begins

More than 2,000 people will be enrolled in a hunt for the genetic causes that underlie “early” heart attacks that strike men and women in middle age. The study is part of the research program of the Starr Center for Human Genetics at The Rockefeller University in New York City. More »

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Mutated Gene Causes Death of Nerves in Brain

A gene responsible for the degeneration and death of certain nerve cells in the brain has been cloned, yielding information that may be useful for further studies of such neurodegenerative diseases as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, investigators from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University and from The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine report in the Aug. 21 Nature. More »

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Resistance to Leptin Contributes to Obesity

Insensitivity to the protein leptin, which helps the body regulate its fat stores, contributes to obesity in mice according to the first formal study of leptin intolerance, report scientists in the Aug. 5 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The findings also provide clues about leptin’s action in the nervous system and may help to explain some forms of obesity that affect humans, including more than 50 million overweight adult Americans, the researchers note. More »

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Rockefeller University Honors William O. Baker, Presents Honorary Degrees to Irene Diamond and Christian de Duve and Awards 21 Doctorates at Graduation Ceremonies

The Rockefeller University will honor William O. Baker, Ph.D., former chairman of the board of AT&T Bell Laboratories, Inc., and award honorary doctoral degrees to philanthropist Irene Diamond and Nobel Prize winner Christian de Duve, Ph.D., M.D., at the institution’s 39th commencement exercises, Thursday, June 12, 1997. More »

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Lewis Thomas Prize Honors Max Perutz

Nobel laureate, molecular biologist and author Max Perutz, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 1997 Lewis Thomas Prize, which honors scientists for their literary achievements and is awarded by The Rockefeller University. More »

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Altered Gene Increases Men’s Risk for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Possessing an altered form of a gene involved in the communication between the brain’s nerve cells may put certain men at greater risk of developing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), report scientists from The Rockefeller University and four other institutions in the April 29 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discovery, the first susceptibility gene isolated for OCD, offers a possible target for developing treatments for the disorder, which affects 1 to 3 percent of the U.S. population. More »

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Scientists Determine 3-D Crystal Structure of Cancer-causing Protein

The three-dimensional picture of a cancer-causing protein illuminates how a mutated gene transforms cells into cancer, report scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at The Rockefeller University in the Feb. 13 Nature. The determination of this structure clarifies earlier models that sought to explain how the gene, called src, works and offers new information for designing drug therapies to fight cancers. More »

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Marker Helps Identify Children at Risk for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Following Streptococcal Infections

A biological marker may identify children at risk for developing obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) after having an untreated streptococcal bacteria infection, according to scientists from The Rockefeller University and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). The discovery will help improve the understanding of the disease process of OCD and related tic disorders such as Tourette’s syndrome. More »

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Behavior and the Brain: A New View of the Nature-Nurture Debate

Nature and nurture affect behavior by influencing the structure and function of the nervous system. How genes, environment and experiences interact to tailor a person’s behavior is the focus of many exciting investigations, which will be featured in a free, three-part series of public lectures at The Rockefeller University. The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations support the series, which features experts from Rockefeller, Harvard University and Cornell University. More »

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Neuroscientist Peter Mombaerts Joins Rockefeller Faculty

An expert in the biology of detecting smell, Peter Mombaerts, M.D., Ph.D., joins the faculty at The Rockefeller University to direct the Laboratory of Vertebrate Developmental Neurogenetics. He will be an assistant professor. More »

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$2.5 Million Grant Supports Training at Biology’s Interface with Chemistry and Physics

The Rockefeller University has received a $2.5 million, five-year grant from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF) to establish a program designed to draw gifted young chemists, physicists and mathematicians to the frontiers of biomedical research. More »

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Gene Identified for Most Common Form of Fanconi anemia

The gene involved in the most common form of an inherited, often fatal disease called Fanconi anemia (FA), which causes severe bone marrow failure, birth defects and a type of leukemia, has been isolated and cloned by scientists in an international consortium of six centers, including The Rockefeller University. The work appears in the November Nature Genetics. More »

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Shrimp OK for Heart Healthy Diets

People no longer need avoid shrimp for its high cholesterol. Steamed shrimp, naturally low in fat, can be included in heart-healthy diets for people without lipid problems, report scientists from The Rockefeller University and the Harvard School of Public Health in the November American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. More »

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Amy Wilkerson Promoted Director of Laboratory Safety and Environmental Health

The Rockefeller University has promoted Amy Wilkerson to director of laboratory safety and environmental health. More »

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Carol B. Einiger Appointed Vice President for Investments

The Rockefeller University has appointed Carol B. Einiger as vice president for investments. In her new position, Einiger will work with the university board of trustees’ finance committee and have responsibility for overseeing and implementing the investment strategy for the university’s endowment. More »

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Brian T. Chait Named Dreyfus Professor, Albert J. Libchaber Appointed Bronk Professor, Ralph Steinman Selected Kunkel Professor

The Rockefeller University has appointed three faculty members to named professorships: mass spectrometrist Brian T. Chait, D. Phil., is the new Camille and Henry Dreyfus Professor, physicist Albert J. Libchaber, M.D., Ph.D., is the new Detlev W. Bronk Professor and immunologist Ralph Steinman, M.D., is the new Henry G. Kunkel Professor. More »

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International Conference Focuses on Form and Function in Biology

Scientists from around the world will gather at Rockefeller University to share new information about the architecture, design and function of biological molecules. The conference, Stereospecificity and Molecular Recognition, will be held Sept. 12 to 15, 1995, in Caspary Hall at the university, 1230 York Avenue, New York City. More »

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Gene Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease Can Protect Brain Cells

A protein made by a gene called apolipoprotein E (apoE) protects cultured nerve cells from the damaging effects of a form of oxygen molecules known to contribute to Alzheimer’s disease, report scientists from The Rockefeller University. The findings, published in the September Nature Genetics, reveal a previously unknown function of apoE and may lead researchers to new therapies to treat Alzheimer’s disease. More »

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Four NY Medical Institutions Join in Electronic Database Sharing Project

The libraries of four medical institutions in New York City will collaborate in a computer venture that provides more than 9,000 researchers and health care professionals with greater and faster access to biomedical databases. More »

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Rockefeller University Awards 25 Ph.D.s and Two Honorary Degrees at 36th Commencement

The Rockefeller University today awarded twenty-five Ph.D. degrees to students at the University’s 36th commencement ceremonies. Two honorary degrees were also given, one to Tsung-Dao (T.D.) Lee, a Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist whose studies have revolutionized scientific understanding of the primary forces that shape the universe, and one to Louis J. Hector, Chairman of the Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust and a long-time champion of the role of basic biomedical research in the struggle against disease. More »

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