Researchers Shed Light on How Cells Commit Suicide

A team of researchers led by Associate Professor David Cowburn,Ph.D., has determined the three-dimensional structure of a moleculethat regulates programmed cell death, a critical process importantfor many diseases, including cancer, heart disease and autoimmunity.The structure, reported in the March 5 issue of the journal Cell,provides a model for developing compounds to switch cell suicideon or off to treat these diseases. More »

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Researchers Report Emergence of Antibiotic Resistance during Vancomycin Therapy

A team of researchers led by The Rockefeller University’s AlexanderTomasz, Ph.D., have described the case of a 79-year-old patientwhose death in a New York metropolitan area hospital last Marchwas associated with a bloodstream infection caused by a multidrug-resistantstrain of Staphylococcus aureus. The report, publishedin the Feb. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine(NEJM), showed that the bacteria, which had decreased susceptibilityto vancomycin, could be treated effectively with a combinationof antibiotics. More »

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A Little Stress May Have Big Benefits for Health

Rockefeller University researchers have shown that brain hormonesrally immune cells in response to stress. The findings, reportedin the Feb. 2 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academyof Sciences (PNAS), contradict the widely held notion thatall stress is bad for health and provides a basis for understandingthe role of stress in health and disease. More »

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400 High School Students Attack Foreign Invaders!: RU Mirsky Lecture on the Body’s Immune Response

On Monday, December 28, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., one of the leaders in the field of immunology will share his latest research with 400 area high school science students at the 39th Annual Alfred E. Mirsky Christmas Lecture Series on Science, The Rockefeller University, Caspary Hall, 1230 York Avenue (at 66th Street). Student attendance is by ticket only. Press coverage is invited. More »

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Rockefeller Discoveries Named Breakthroughs of the Year by Science Magazine

The Rockefeller University, the nation’s first biomedical research institute, will celebrate its Centennial in just two years. Most of the greatest scientific discoveries of the century are rooted in Rockefeller, including two Science magazine Breakthroughs of 1998 — on circadian rhythm and the biochemical roots of the nervous system. The university’s mission, to pursue science of the highest standard for the good of humanity, is captured in its motto pro bono humani generis. More »

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Scientists Show That Normal-looking Cells in Cervical Cancer May Be Abnormal

Researchers from The Rockefeller University and Digilab, using a technique called infrared (IR) spectroscopy, have shown that normal-looking cells taken from women with cervical cancer may actually be abnormal. The findings, published in the Dec. 22 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, may expand the definition of cancer, and lead to improved diagnostic techniques, such as reading of Pap smears. More »

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Scientists Show for the First Time How Leprosy Bug Targets Peripheral Nerves

A team of researchers, led by scientists from The Rockefeller University, have identified how the bacterium that causes leprosy targets the peripheral nerve, the crucial step leading to nerve damage in this disease. The findings, reported in the Dec. 11 issue of the journal Science, open a window on developing treatments for the prevention of nerve damage in leprosy and also for understanding the underlying mechanisms of early events of nerve damage in other neurodegenerative diseases such as muscular dystrophy, multiple sclerosis and various types of peripheral nerve diseases. More »

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Arnold J. Levine Becomes Eighth President of The Rockefeller University.

Arnold J. Levine, one of the world’s leading cancer researchers, officially became the eighth president of The Rockefeller University at the university’s board meeting on Wed., Dec. 2. Levine, who was elected president in June 1998, succeeds Torsten N. Wiesel, who is retiring after seven years of service as Rockefeller’s president. More »

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Rockefeller Researchers Show First Evidence for Naturally Occurring Tumor Immunity in Humans

A team of researchers from The Rockefeller University have now shown for the first time that humans are able to develop naturally occurring immunity to cancer. The study, reported in the November issue of Nature Medicine, provides support for the recent efforts to treat cancer patients by activating their immune response in a manner that would lead to tumor immunity, a treatment called immunotherapy. An understanding of naturally occurring tumor immunity is important for the development of better strategies to treat cancer. More »

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Mariellen Gallagher Joins Rockefeller University as Vice President for Communications and Public Affairs

Mariellen Gallagher, who has handled external affairs for three major universities, has been appointed vice president for communications and public affairs at The Rockefeller University. The announcement was made jointly by Arnold Levine, Ph.D., the president-elect of The Rockefeller University, and Torsten N. Wiesel, M.D., the current president. More »

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Structure of Enzyme Involved in Gentamicin Resistance Revealed for First Time

A team of scientists, led by researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) at The Rockefeller University, has determined the three-dimensional structure of an enzyme responsible for resistance of certain bacteria to the antibiotic gentamicin. The structure, reported in the August 21 Cell, is the first for this family of antibiotics and presents a possible target for designing drugs to thwart resistance. More »

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Subtle Changes in Brain Receptor Gene May Have Significant Consequences for Addiction

Scientists have identified five slightly different versions of the mu opioid receptor gene that alter the activity of a molecule called b-endorphin, a member of the endorphin family of proteins that can numb pain, create feelings of euphoria or increase energy, which opiates and other drugs of analgesia and addiction do as well. The findings, reported by researchers from The Rockefeller University, Indiana University School of Medicine and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine in the August 4 Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences, show for the first time that these altered molecules are distributed differently among ethnic groups and have implications for normal physiology, therapeutics and vulnerability to develop or protect from diverse diseases involving mu opioid receptors, including the addictive diseases. More »

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Scientists Track Spread of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in 12 New York City Hospitals

A team of researchers led by scientists from The Rockefeller University and the Public Health Research Institute (PHRI) used molecular fingerprinting techniques to track the spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 12 hospitals in the New York City metropolitan area. The findings, published in the July issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases, confirms the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of staph in New York City. More »

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Scientists Identify New Gene That Controls Sleep/Wake Cycle

A newly discovered gene called double-time regulates the molecular cycles underlying circadian rhythms, scientists from The Rockefeller University report in two papers featured on the cover of the July 10 issue of Cell. The researchers also identified the molecular mechanism that allows this gene to work. More »

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Arnold J. Levine Named President of Rockefeller University

Dr. Arnold J. Levine, the Harry C. Wiess Professor in the Life Sciences at Princeton University and a world-renowned cancer biologist, has been elected the eighth president of The Rockefeller University. Dr. Levine was selected to succeed Dr. Torsten N. Wiesel, who will retire this fall after seven years of service as Rockefeller’s president. Levine will assume the presidency after the regularly scheduled November board of trustees meeting. More »

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Lewis Thomas Prize Honors Ernst Mayr

Evolutionary biologist and author Ernst Mayr, Ph.D., is the recipient of the 1998 Lewis Thomas Prize: Honoring the Scientist as Poet. The prize, which honors scientists for their literary achievements, is awarded by The Rockefeller University. More »

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Rockefeller University Researchers Hunt for Type 2 Diabetes Susceptibility Genes

The Rockefeller University is looking for people with type 2 diabetes to participate in a study aimed at determining the genetic causes of early- and late-onset forms of the disease. The study is part of the research program of the university’s Starr Center for Human Genetics. More »

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Researchers from Rockefeller University Develop Novel Method to Fight Cancer

Researchers from The Rockefeller University in New York City have developed a new method to fight cancer by using dendritic cells to activate T cells via a new pathway. Reported in the March 5 Nature, the technique offers the promise of new therapies for cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. More »

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Rockefeller University Creates Center for Immune Disease Research

The Rockefeller University will launch the Christopher H. Browne Center for Immunology and Immune Diseases with a $5 million gift from university Trustee Christopher H. Browne, managing director of the investment firm Tweedy Browne Company, LLC. The center will provide immunologists at the university with access to the next generation of sophisticated laboratory technologies, speeding the progress of research on a broad spectrum of diseases that involve the immune system, including cancer, AIDS and other infectious diseases, and such autoimmune disorders as arthritis, asthma, diabetes, and lupus. More »

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From the Center for the Advancement of Health: Stress: It’s Not Just All in Your Head

Please refer to the following link: http://www.cfah.org/

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