Gene Involved in Brain Development Identified

Scientists from The Rockefeller University and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) have for the first time identified a gene involved in directing nerve cells to their destinations as the brain grows. Their work appears in the April 19 Science. More »

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Mucosal Tissue Site of AIDS Virus Replication in Clinically Well HIV-Infected People

The mucous membranes that lie above the lymph glands of the throat can be a major site of HIV-1 replication in people infected with the virus that causes AIDS but who have not yet developed clinical symptoms, report scientists from The Rockefeller University and the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) in the April 5 Science. More »

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Light Sets the Molecular Controls of Circadian Rhythm

Light sets the circadian rhythm by eliminating a key protein needed for the molecular mechanism of the body’s clock, according to scientists in the March 22 Science. The findings, from fruit fly studies, may help explain light’s effect on the daily cycle that influences sleep, mental alertness, pain sensitivity and temperature and hormone levels. More »

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Students from Stuyvesant High School and Midwood High School Win Science Fair, Off to International Competition in May

Aaron Wong and Ting Luo, seniors at Stuyvesant High School, captured the first and second place awards, respectively, at the New York City regional competition of the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) held Friday and Saturday, March 15 and 16, at The Rockefeller University. Saif Ahmed and Zhen Huang, juniors at Midwood High School, garnered the first place team project. Ten other students received top honors as well. More »

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Students from 16 New York Metro High Schools Compete in Science Fair

More than 70 juniors and seniors from 16 high schools in the metropolitan area will participate in the New York City regional competition of the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), Friday and Saturday, March 15 and 16, at The Rockefeller University. More »

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Cells Leap Frog On The Way To Becoming Nerve Cells

Kids aren’t the only ones who play Leap Frog. Cells destined to become nerves in the brain do too, according to scientists from The Rockefeller University, who published their findings in the Feb. 16 Science. The information reveals a new mechanism of migration used by nerve cell precursors and could help in the design of therapies that would replace diseased or injured nerve cells in the human brain. More »

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Genes in Overweight Mice, Rats Carry Instructions for Leptin Receptor

The diabetes (db) gene in mice and the fatty (fa) gene in rats are not only the same genes, they also carry instructions to make the receptor for the protein called leptin, which is known to signal the body’s fat, report scientists at The Rockefeller University and Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc., in the Feb. 16 Science. More »

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Mutations in a Leptin Receptor Cause Obesity in Mice

The weight-reducing effects of leptin, a hormone that signals the size of the body’s fat stores, result from an interaction with a receptor in the brain’s hypothalamus, report scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) at The Rockefeller University in the Feb. 15 Nature. More »

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Tracking Global Threats Via the Internet

A global system that allows for early warning, communications, diagnosis, prevention and control could greatly limit the public health threats of illness and death that emerging diseases pose, says Stephen S. Morse, Ph.D., assistant professor of virology at The Rockefeller University. More »

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How Many People Can The Earth Support?

If the human population continued growing at the rate seen in 1990, the world would tally 694 billion people by the year 2150, the United Nations predicts. But that’s not likely, says Joel E. Cohen, Ph.D., professor and head of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University. More »

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Behavior and the Brain: A New View of the Nature-Nurture Debate

Nature and nurture affect behavior by influencing the structure and function of the nervous system. How genes, environment and experiences interact to tailor a person’s behavior is the focus of many exciting investigations, which will be featured in a free, three-part series of public lectures at The Rockefeller University. The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations support the series, which features experts from Rockefeller, Harvard University and Cornell University. More »

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Human Genetics Center Created at Rockefeller University

The Rockefeller University has established The Starr Center for Human Genetics, one of the largest U.S. centers for the study of diseases linked to heredity. The Starr Foundation provided a $5 million grant to establish the center, which will allow scientists to pursue studies of hundreds of families affected by such illnesses as heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. More »

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Newly Identified Protein Caps Chromosomes Ends

A newly isolated protein is a vital part of human telomeres, the shields that guard the ends of chromosomes against damage and destruction. Scientists at Rockefeller University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center report their identification and cloning of the protein in the Dec. 8 Science. More »

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Special Proteins Transmit Signals Within Cells

Special proteins play a key role in receiving and sending messages that influence the careers of healthy and diseased cells. In an innovative laboratory approach, Rockefeller University scientists developed probes that reveal the shape, structure and function of proteins that relay commands to govern a cell’s growth, role, movement and death. More »

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Flu Vaccines, Cell Growth, DNA and Psoriasis: A Day of Virology and Cell Biology

What kind of flu vaccine does a better job than natural immunity or an inactivated virus vaccine? How do genes tell a cell to stop growing? How does a virus gets its genetic material into the DNA of a host cell? What cellular combat occurs during an outbreak of the skin disease psoriasis? These topics and others are among the presentations by scientists from around the world participating in the Igor Tamm Memorial Symposium at Rockefeller University Thurs., Nov. 30, 1995. More »

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Epstein, Kandel and Kissinger Join Rockefeller University Board of Trustees

The board of trustees of Rockefeller University has elected investor Jeffrey E. Epstein, neurobiologist Eric R. Kandel, M.D., and Nancy M. Kissinger, M.A., as new members. More »

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Circadian Rhythm Set by Pairing of Two Proteins

The molecular control of the daily cycle known as circadian rhythm lies in the pairing of two proteins, scientists report in a trio of papers in the Nov. 3 Science. The findings, from fruit fly studies, promise to help scientists better understand human, animal and plant circadian rhythms, which influence cell and body biochemistry, health, aging and behavior. More »

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Leptin Helps Body Regulate Fat, Links to Diet

Leptin, a protein produced by fat, appears to play an important role in how the body manages its supply of fat, report scientists in the November Nature Medicine. More »

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Japanese Government Honors Rockefeller University Professor for Cancer Research

The Japanese government will present Japan’s Order of Culture to cancer researcher Hidesaburo Hanafusa, Ph.D., Leon Hess Professor at The Rockefeller University, in a ceremony at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo on Friday, Nov. 3. More »

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Lecture: How Many People Can the Earth Support?

Come hear Joel E. Cohen, M.P.H., Ph.D., Dr.P.H., professor and director of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University and author of the forthcoming book, How Many People Can the Earth Support?, due this December from W.W. Norton & Company, as he discusses how human choices about economies, environment, values and politics are just as important as supplies of food, water and livable land in determining Earth’s people capacity. More »

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