Human Genetics Center Created at Rockefeller University

The Rockefeller University has established The Starr Center for Human Genetics, one of the largest U.S. centers for the study of diseases linked to heredity. The Starr Foundation provided a $5 million grant to establish the center, which will allow scientists to pursue studies of hundreds of families affected by such illnesses as heart disease, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. More »

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Newly Identified Protein Caps Chromosomes Ends

A newly isolated protein is a vital part of human telomeres, the shields that guard the ends of chromosomes against damage and destruction. Scientists at Rockefeller University and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center report their identification and cloning of the protein in the Dec. 8 Science. More »

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Special Proteins Transmit Signals Within Cells

Special proteins play a key role in receiving and sending messages that influence the careers of healthy and diseased cells. In an innovative laboratory approach, Rockefeller University scientists developed probes that reveal the shape, structure and function of proteins that relay commands to govern a cell’s growth, role, movement and death. More »

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Flu Vaccines, Cell Growth, DNA and Psoriasis: A Day of Virology and Cell Biology

What kind of flu vaccine does a better job than natural immunity or an inactivated virus vaccine? How do genes tell a cell to stop growing? How does a virus gets its genetic material into the DNA of a host cell? What cellular combat occurs during an outbreak of the skin disease psoriasis? These topics and others are among the presentations by scientists from around the world participating in the Igor Tamm Memorial Symposium at Rockefeller University Thurs., Nov. 30, 1995. More »

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Epstein, Kandel and Kissinger Join Rockefeller University Board of Trustees

The board of trustees of Rockefeller University has elected investor Jeffrey E. Epstein, neurobiologist Eric R. Kandel, M.D., and Nancy M. Kissinger, M.A., as new members. More »

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Circadian Rhythm Set by Pairing of Two Proteins

The molecular control of the daily cycle known as circadian rhythm lies in the pairing of two proteins, scientists report in a trio of papers in the Nov. 3 Science. The findings, from fruit fly studies, promise to help scientists better understand human, animal and plant circadian rhythms, which influence cell and body biochemistry, health, aging and behavior. More »

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Leptin Helps Body Regulate Fat, Links to Diet

Leptin, a protein produced by fat, appears to play an important role in how the body manages its supply of fat, report scientists in the November Nature Medicine. More »

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Japanese Government Honors Rockefeller University Professor for Cancer Research

The Japanese government will present Japan’s Order of Culture to cancer researcher Hidesaburo Hanafusa, Ph.D., Leon Hess Professor at The Rockefeller University, in a ceremony at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo on Friday, Nov. 3. More »

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Lecture: How Many People Can the Earth Support?

Come hear Joel E. Cohen, M.P.H., Ph.D., Dr.P.H., professor and director of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University and author of the forthcoming book, How Many People Can the Earth Support?, due this December from W.W. Norton & Company, as he discusses how human choices about economies, environment, values and politics are just as important as supplies of food, water and livable land in determining Earth’s people capacity. More »

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Neuroscientist A. James Hudspeth Joins Rockefeller Faculty

An expert in the neurobiology and biophysics of hearing, A. James Hudspeth, Ph.D., M.D., joins the faculty at The Rockefeller University as the F.M. Kirby Professor. The chair is made possible by a gift of $2 million from the F.M. Kirby Foundation, Inc., which supports health, educational, cultural, religious and other charitable organizations. Hudspeth also is an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a position he will continue at Rockefeller. More »

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Fat, Body Weight Regulated by Newly Discovered Hormone

A protein, identified in mice and humans, reduced body weight in mice by 30 percent after two weeks of treatment, report scientists in the July 28 Science. The findings have important implications for understanding the causes of obesity, which affects one in three Americans. More »

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Insulin Plays Role in Controlling Fat Craving

Insulin, the hormone needed by the body to process sugar, appears to influence a brain chemical that mediates cravings for fatty foods, according to ongoing studies by Sarah F. Leibowitz, Ph. D., a neurobiologist at The Rockefeller University. More »

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David Rockefeller Honored, 20 Doctorates Awarded at Rockefeller University Graduation

The Rockefeller University will dedicate its 37th commencement exercises, Thursday, June 15, 1995, to David Rockefeller for his extraordinary 55 years of service on the institution’s board of trustees, from which he is retiring. More »

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Rockefeller Researchers Find Evidence That Weight Change in Humans Affects Metabolism

A team of researchers at The Rockefeller University, led by Dr. Rudolph Leibel, has shown that the human body maintains a stable weight by increasing the number of calories burned when weight is gained, and slowing the rate when weight is lost. Dr. Jules Hirsch, Sherman M. Fairchild Professor and physician-in-chief of the Rockefeller University Hospital, and Dr. Michael Rosenbaum are co-authors of the study, to be published tomorrow in The New England Journal of Medicine. More »

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Rockefeller Researchers Clone Gene for Obesity

Fifty years after the discovery at Rockefeller University that genes are made of DNA, Dr. Jeffrey M. Friedman of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Rockefeller University and a team of Rockefeller researchers has cloned the first recessive obesity gene in mice and its human homologue, opening a new era for the understanding and, potentially, the treatment of obesity. More »

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Rockefeller University Awards 25 Ph.D.s and Two Honorary Degrees at 36th Commencement

The Rockefeller University today awarded twenty-five Ph.D. degrees to students at the University’s 36th commencement ceremonies. Two honorary degrees were also given, one to Tsung-Dao (T.D.) Lee, a Nobel Prize-winning theoretical physicist whose studies have revolutionized scientific understanding of the primary forces that shape the universe, and one to Louis J. Hector, Chairman of the Lucille P. Markey Charitable Trust and a long-time champion of the role of basic biomedical research in the struggle against disease. More »

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French Nobelist, Author, to Receive 1994 Lewis Thomas Prize from Rockefeller University

Seeking to honor that rare individual in whom the two cultures of science and art are combined, The Rockefeller University will present François Jacob, the Nobel Prize-winning molecular geneticist and highly acclaimed author of three books on science, with the second Lewis Thomas Prize on Wednesday, May 25. More »

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Rockefeller University Celebrates 50th Anniversary of Discovery That Genes Are Made of DNA

Fifty years to the day of the publication of the historic paper that showed that genes are made of DNA–considered by many to be the single most important scientific finding in biology of the 20th century–The Rockefeller University will host an anniversary toast at the site of the original discovery, The Rockefeller University Hospital. This celebration, on Tues., Feb. 1, will be followed by a week-long series of events devoted to exploring various aspects of the original discovery. More »

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Team Led by Rockefeller University Researcher Develops New Drug to Control Infant Jaundice

A team of researchers led by Dr. A. Kappas of The Rockefeller University has developed a new drug that effectively controls the development of jaundice in preterm newborns. The drug, called SnMP, blocks the production of bilirubin, the yellow pigment that leads to severe jaundice when it builds up in the blood faster than the liver can process it. More »

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