Robert Darnell named president of New York Genome Center

Darnell will direct all aspects of the NYGC, including its scientific and research activities, and the recruitment and development of a world-class scientific team in genomic research and medicine. Founded in 2010, the NYGC will be one of the largest genomics research facilities in North America, integrating sequencing, bioinformatics and data management. More »

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Brain displays an intrinsic mechanism for fighting infection

Researchers in the St. Giles Laboratory of Human Genetics of Infectious Diseases have shed light on how a genetic defect leaves some children susceptible to a rare and damaging brain infection and have found evidence of an intrinsic immune mechanism in the brain that fights the viral infection in healthy people. More »

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Potent antibodies neutralize HIV and could offer new therapy, study finds

Rockefeller researchers in Michel Nussenzweig’s Laboratory of Molecular Immunology have found that a newly-discovered class of especially potent antibodies is effective at neutralizing HIV infection in mice for a 60 day period, longer than current antiretroviral drugs which require daily application. The antibodies, which suppressed the virus when used in combination, could one day be given to humans to treat the disease. More »

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Nicholson Lecture brings vascular biologist to speak at Rockefeller as part of exchange program with Karolinska Institute

Christer Betsholtz will visit the Rockefeller University campus as part of a recently renewed program that supports research exchanges between the university and the Karolinska Institute. Betsholtz studies vascular biology, with a focus on cellular and molecular mechanisms for angiogenesis and vascular permeability. More »

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Neurotransmitters linked to mating behavior are shared by mammals and worms

New research from Rockefeller University has shown that chemicals in the brain — neuropeptides known as vasopressin and oxytocin — play a role in coordinating mating and reproductive behavior in animals ranging from humans to fish to invertebrates. More »

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Elaine Fuchs awarded distinguished medal from New York Academy of Medicine

Fuchs, head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at Rockefeller University, will be awarded the 2012 Academy Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Science for her innovative and imaginative approaches to research in skin biology, its stem cells and its associated human genetic disorders. More »

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Rockefeller fellow receives NIH ‘early independence award’ to study immune responses with high throughput sequencing

A 2012 graduate of the Tri-Institutional M.D.-Ph.D. program, Brad Rosenberg is one of 14 early-career investigators across the country to receive an NIH Director’s Early Independence Award, a five-year, $2.1 million grant that will allow him to establish his own research program at Rockefeller. More »

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Shai Shaham and Sean Brady receive promotions

Shaham, head of the Laboratory of Developmental Genetics, studies the control of programmed cell death during animal development and the roles of glial cells in nervous system development and function. He has been awarded tenure and promoted to professor. Brady, head of the Laboratory of Genetically Encoded Small Molecules, looks for new genetically encoded small molecules from bacterial sources, chemicals that may play a role in the development of new pharmaceuticals. He has been promoted to associate professor.

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Jeffrey M. Friedman awarded 11th IPSEN Endocrine Regulation Prize

Friedman is being recognized for his groundbreaking discovery of leptin, a hormone that regulates food intake and energy expenditure. His observations provided scientists with a new target for treating obesity and other metabolic diseases.
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Five Rockefeller scientists receive high risk-high reward NIH grants

Two Rockefeller University faculty have been awarded the NIH Director’s Transformative Award and three are being given New Innovator Awards.
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Pearl Meister Greengard Prize to be awarded to pioneering RNA researcher Joan Steitz

A prestigious Rockefeller University award for exceptional women scientists recognizes a pioneer in the field of RNA biology whose discoveries involved patients with a variety of autoimmune diseases. Steitz will receive the award from National Geographic Explorer in Residence Sylvia Earle at a ceremony in Rockefeller’s Caspary Auditorium on November 29. More »

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Vitamin D supplements do not improve cholesterol as previous research suggested

A team of scientists has shown that, at least in the short term, cholesterol levels did not improve when volunteers with vitamin D deficiency received mega-doses of vitamin D. Although previous evidence suggested there might be a link between vitamin D and heart disease, the clinical results confirm those from a data mining study published in July. More »

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Researchers demonstrate how ‘interfering’ RNA can block bacterial evolution

Experiments in pneumococcal bacteria show how an RNA interference mechanism known as CRISPR can be used to prevent the uptake of genetic material from the environment. Harnessing this mechanism could be a new way to manipulate bacterial evolution in ways that might be medically useful. More »

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Michael W. Young receives Massry Prize

The prize recognizes outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences and the advancement of health, and Young is being honored for his groundbreaking work on the molecular biology of circadian rhythms. Young’s work spans nearly three decades of research on the biological clocks that regulate our bodies’ patterns of sleep and wakefulness, metabolism and response to disease. More »

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Protein proves vital in immune response to bacteria

Research led by Rockefeller University scientists found that a protein once thought to be mainly involved in antiviral immunity is instead vital to fighting a type of bacteria that cause diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy.
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Jean-Laurent Casanova to receive 2012 Milstein Award

The award is bestowed upon a leading biomedical research scientist who has made outstanding contributions to interferon and cytokine research, either in a basic or applied field. Casanova’s studies have important clinical implications, as they provide a rationale for developing new therapeutic approaches based on an understanding of the host component of infectious diseases. More »

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Collaboration finds kidney disease tied to DNA damage

A research collaboration involving Rockefeller University and more than two dozen other institutions found that patients who had a specific kind of kidney disease — called karyomegalic interstitial nephritis — were likely to also have a mutation on FAN1, a gene that is involved in fixing DNA damage. More »

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Starr collaboration illuminates mysterious pathway to immortality in cancer cells

A detailed analysis of a large panel of so-called ALT cell lines shows that they frequently undergo chromosomal changes and are impaired in their ability to detect and repair damage in their DNA. The work suggests a mechanism by which 10 to 15 percent of human cancers develop. More »

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Jeffrey Ravetch wins 2012 Sanofi – Institut Pasteur Award

The award recognizes researchers for their past or ongoing studies advancing understanding of the life sciences, and Ravetch is being recognized for discovering mechanisms by which antibodies carry out their diverse biological functions. He is one of four scientists to be honored for research projects in tropical and neglected diseases, innovative vaccines, new approaches to drug resistance and therapeutic approaches to senescence. More »

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Sweat glands grown from newly identified stem cells

A team of researchers led by scientists at Rockefeller University have shown how sweat glands develop and how their cells respond to injury. Their research also identifies the stem cells within the sweat glands and sweat ducts and enables scientists to begin to explore the cells’ potential for making tissues for the first time. More »

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