Tag Archives: Bruce S. McEwen

Jeffrey M. Friedman awarded 11th IPSEN Endocrine Regulation Prize

Friedman is being recognized for his groundbreaking discovery of leptin, a hormone that regulates food intake and energy expenditure. His observations provided scientists with a new target for treating obesity and other metabolic diseases.
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Bruce S. McEwen to receive Scolnick Prize for research on brain hormones

Bruce S. McEwen, a pioneer in understanding how hormones affect the brain, will receive the 2011 Edward M. Scolnick Prize in Neuroscience from the McGovern Institute for Brain Research at MIT. McEwen is being honored for research on how hormones affect the brain’s structure, how they shape responses to stress, how they contribute to sexual differences and how they affect our health and well-being. More »

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‘Round-the-clock’ lifestyle could disrupt metabolism, brain and behavior

The modern world twists our ancient and natural sleep cycles with ubiquitous electric lighting, shift-work and the like. Now new research in mice suggests that the disturbance could have a serious impact on the body and brain, from weight gain and cognitive inflexibility to poor impulse control. More »

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Donald W. Pfaff and Bruce S. McEwen will share 2010 Fondation IPSEN Neuronal Plasticity Prize

Donald W. Pfaff and Bruce S. McEwen share the 2010 Fondation IPSEN Neuronal Plasticity Prize for their studies on the neuroendocrine control of behavior. The French foundation presents the award to researchers who publish remarkable, pioneering studies. More »

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Research identifies gene that changes the brain’s response to stress

Brains change. They change throughout life, responding to developmental but also environmental cues, like stress. Scientists know of several important proteins that play a role in what brains do with new experience. Now they have identified one, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which must be present at a certain level to enable the brain’s “adaptive plasticity,” particularly in response to stress. More »

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Research identifies gene with likely role in premenstrual disorder

Some women are especially sensitive to the natural flux of hormones in the menstrual cycle. New research points to a gene that likely influences how women respond to swings in estrogen levels and could help diagnose and treat premenstrual dysphoric disorder, a condition marked by extreme mood swings and irritability. The work also provides insight into the historically understudied area of medically relevant differences between men and women. More »

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First evidence that the brain’s native dendritic cells can muster an immune response

Since their initial discovery in 1973, dendritic cells, the sentinels of the immune system, have turned up in a number of places other than the immune organs. They stand guard in the heart, for instance, and in 2008, the first population native to the brain was identified. New research shows that dendritic cells are not only present in the brain, but active, too. They confront foreign substances and seem to form a barrier between healthy and stricken brain tissue following a stroke. More »

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Acute stress leaves epigenetic marks on the hippocampus

Scientists are learning that the dynamic regulation of genes — as much as the genes themselves — shapes the fate of organisms. Now the discovery of a new epigenetic mechanism regulating genes in the brain under stress is helping change the way scientists think about psychiatric disorders and could open new avenues to treatment. More »

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Disrupting sleep causes problems for the body and brain

Modern life disrupts our natural sleep cycles with shift-work, jet lag and ubiquitous electric lighting, among other things. New research in mice suggests that the resulting disturbance of nature’s circadian rhythms could have major effects on the body and brain, from a slowing of metabolism to impaired thinking and poor impulse control. More »

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Research identifies early childhood conditions that lead to adult health disparities

The origins of many adult diseases can be traced to early negative experiences associated with social class and other markers of disadvantage. Confronting the causes of adversity before and shortly after birth may be a promising way to improve adult health and reduce premature deaths, researchers argue in a paper published today in JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association. More »

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Rockefeller neuroscientist applies basic science to health care reform

Rockefeller University neuroscientist Bruce S. McEwen — who served as moderator of a recent panel at the Institute on Medicine’s Summit on Integrative Medicine and the Health of the Public — brings his molecular understanding of stress to bear on the national health policy debate. More »

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Protein found linking stress and depression

Unrelenting stress can both cause and exacerbate a host of psychological disorders, but researchers don’t know exactly how. Pushing forward a mechanistic explanation of how stress works the brain over, scientists at Rockefeller have identified an important piece of a cell receptor that is behind anatomical changes in parts of brains under stress. The particular piece, or subunit, has been recently implicated in major depression, response to antidepressants and also susceptibility to suicidal ideation, in the STAR*D trial, the largest study of antidepressant-treatment response conducted to date. More »

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Rockefeller neurobiologist proposes ‘The end of sex as we once knew it”

Brain structures involved in learning and memory are shaped differently by different hormones. Does that mean women are from Venus and men are from Mars? No. But it does mean, contrary to accepted dogma and more in line with common sense, that the sexes differ in ways other than their reproductive organs. More »

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Stress disrupts human thinking, but the brain can bounce back

Med school students prepping for their boards and rodents digging for food have a bit of psychology in common: Stress hampers their nimbler thinking abilities. A new neuroimaging study, building on earlier rodent research, shows that stressed-out men, like rats, have a hard time shifting their attention from one task to another. But the work holds good news too, for both rats and humans: Their brains are resilient. Less than one month after the stress disappears, the quick thinking returns. More »

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First evidence of native dendritic cells in brain

In a finding that has the potential to change the way researchers think about the brain, Rockefeller scientists have found immunity-directing dendritic cells where they’ve never been seen before: among the organ’s neurons and connective cells. More »

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New drug may help rescue the aging brain

An experimental compound appears to prevent inflammation and stimulate neurotransmitter production in older rats. Taken chronically, it may have the ability to fend off memory impairment, depression, Parkinson’s, and other ailments. More »

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Immune cells in the brains of aging mice prove more functional than expected

Higher levels of signaling molecules in the brain have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases, leading researchers to look closely at the immune cells — called microglia — that produce them. But although the frequency of these diseases increases with age, new research shows that the microglia in the brains of older animals are just as functional as those in younger ones. More »

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Newborns could benefit from time away from home, rodent study suggests

New research by Rockefeller University neurobiologists shows that newborn rats placed in a new environment — without their mother present — experience greater brain growth as adults than pups that remain in their home environment. Extrapolated to humans, the results suggest that children who receive childcare outside of their home environments might achieve better social and cognitive development. More »

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Chronic stress effects attention by altering neuronal response in the brain

Anxiety and depression can make a person feel as if he’s battling his own brain, complete with wounds and scars. Traumatic events — war, divorce, the death of a loved one — can trigger these disorders, and scientists are just beginning to clarify the biological connection. Now, working neuron by neuron, researchers have found that life experiences actually appear to change the length and complexity of individual brain cells. More »

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McEwen to receive Pasarow Award

Rockefeller University’s Bruce McEwen, whose laboratory studies how the brain changes in response to stress and other experiences, will receive the 2005 Neuropsychiatry Research Award from the Robert J. and Claire Pasarow Foundation. More »

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