Tag Archives: Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs receives prestigious award from American Association for Cancer Research

Fuchs is being recognized with the 2014 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR International Award for Cancer Research for her contributions to the understanding of skin, skin stem cells and skin-related disease. Fuchs is highly regarded for her studies using reverse genetics to understand the biological basis of normal and abnormal skin development and function. The award, now in its 17th year, recognizes an individual scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in basic or translational cancer research. More »

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New RNA interference technique finds seven genes for head and neck cancer

The technique, created by scientists in Rockefeller’s Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development, attaches short pieces of RNA to highly concentrated viruses and uses ultrasound to inject the viruses into mouse embryos. It takes a fraction of the resources and much less time than using knockout mice to conduct genetic screens, and can assess about 300 genes in a single mouse in as little as five weeks. More »

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New technique in RNA interference cuts time and cost in genetic screens

Rockefeller scientists revealed the first genome-wide RNA interference screen of a mouse, using a new technique that essentially treats the surface of living mouse embryos as a petri dish of cells, allowing for in vivo analysis. More »

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Researchers find molecule that causes sunburn pain

A collaboration between Elaine Fuch’s Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at Rockefeller University and researchers at Duke University and the University of California, San Francisco, found that blocking a molecule called TRPV4 greatly protects against the painful effects of sunburn. The research could yield a way to combat sunburn and possibly several other causes of pain. More »

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Scientists identify gene that regulates stem cell death and skin regeneration

A collaboration between researchers in Hermann Steller’s Strang Laboratory of Apoptosis and Cancer Biology and Elaine Fuchs’s Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development has revealed a new function for a gene previously shown to prevent stem cells from turning cancerous. The gene, Sept4/ARTS, has now been shown to regulate programmed death in skin stem cells, a finding that may have implications for wound healing, regeneration and cancer. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive Pasarow Award

Pasarow awards, first presented in 1987, honor extraordinary achievement, creativity and distinction in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular disease and neuropsychiatry.

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Elaine Fuchs awarded distinguished medal from New York Academy of Medicine

Fuchs, head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at Rockefeller University, will be awarded the 2012 Academy Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Science for her innovative and imaginative approaches to research in skin biology, its stem cells and its associated human genetic disorders. More »

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Sweat glands grown from newly identified stem cells

A team of researchers led by scientists at Rockefeller University have shown how sweat glands develop and how their cells respond to injury. Their research also identifies the stem cells within the sweat glands and sweat ducts and enables scientists to begin to explore the cells’ potential for making tissues for the first time. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive 2012 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

The award recognizes Fuchs’s contributions to our understanding of skin biology and skin stem cells, including discoveries that have led to advancements in treating skin cancer and severe burns.

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Cancer stem cells identified, offering new drug targets

Stem cell researchers at Rockefeller University have identified stem cells of squamous cell skin carcinoma, the second most common cancer in the world, and their molecular signature. The researchers find differences between cancer stem cells and healthy skin stem cells, which provide invaluable diagnostic marker and suggests the possibility to specifically target the root of cancer while leaving normal cells unaffected. More »

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Elaine Fuchs awarded 2011 Albany Medical Center Prize

Rockefeller scientist is recognized for her contributions toward realizing the vast potential of stem cells to treat and reverse disease. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive Passano Award

World leader in skin biology and its human genetic disorders is honored for landmark contributions to skin biology and its disorders, including genetic syndromes, stem cells and cancers. More »

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New genetic technique probes the cause of skin cell differentiation in mammals

Most complex genetic experiments have been done in simple model organisms like flies and worms, because they’re easier to work with. But new research at Rockefeller University has applied the technique of RNA interference to probe the DNA of our fellow mammal, the mouse. In the process, the researchers are uncovering a deeper understanding of cell differentiation in early development, and hope to apply the results to cancer research. More »

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Research shows when stem cell descendants lose their versatility

The precocious progenitors of every cell in the body — stem cells — have commitment issues. They must remain unattached to maintain the versatility they need to respond to injuries, regenerate tissues and do their other jobs. New research defines the point at which a developing lineage of hair follicle stem cells do settle down, however, and commit to their mission to grow new hair. The findings also reflect a new concept in stem cell biology: that the newly specialized cells send signals back to the stem cells from which they originated, regulating their behavior. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive 2010 L’Oréal-UNESCO prize for women scientists

Elaine Fuchs — one of five women scientists around the world selected by the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science partnership to receive the 2010 L’Oréal-UNESCO Awards in the Life Sciences — is honored for her contributions to our knowledge of skin biology and skin stem cells. More »

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Elaine Fuchs receives National Medal of Science

Elaine Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor, is being honored “for her pioneering use of cell biology and molecular genetics in mice to understand the basis of inherited diseases in humans and her outstanding contributions to our understanding of the biology of skin and its disorders, including her notable investigations of adult skin stem cells, cancers and genetic syndromes.” More »

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Epigenetic mark guides stem cells toward their destiny

Not all stem cells are completely blank slates. Some, known as adult stem cells, have already partially embraced their fates. Researchers now highlight the interactions between genetic and epigenetic regulators in skin stem cells and how these interactions change as stem cells begin the process of specialization. The findings may also lead to new therapies for prematurely born infants who have not yet fully formed the skin. More »

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Stem cells in hair follicles point to general model of organ regeneration

Most people consider hair as a purely cosmetic part of their lives. To others, it may help uncover one of nature’s best-kept secrets: the body’s ability to regenerate organs. New research now gets to the root of the problem, revealing that the hair follicle uses a two-step mechanism to activate its stem cells and order them to divide. The mechanism provides insights into how stem cells may be organized in other body tissues to support organ regeneration. More »

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Scientists identify a molecule that coordinates the movements of cells

An elaborate track of exceptionally strong proteins known as the extracellular matrix allows cells to migrate toward wounds and heal them. It also gives cancer cells a way to spread. Now, new research from Rockefeller University shows that a recently discovered molecule called ACF7 orchestrates and powers this directed movement. The finding offers a new potential target for setting up a roadblock for the spread of cancer. More »

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microRNA-203 helps build skin’s protective barrier

It’s a rough world, and exposed skin cells weather conditions harsh enough to mutate DNA. To keep these mutations from spreading, evolution has found a way to keep these cells from proliferating. In a series of elegant experiments, Rockefeller University researchers have now discovered evolution’s solution: a tiny strand of RNA. But the research’s implications go deeper, and may also suggest how healthy cells elsewhere in the body can turn cancerous. More »

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