Tag Archives: Elaine Fuchs

Elaine Fuchs to receive Pasarow Award

Pasarow awards, first presented in 1987, honor extraordinary achievement, creativity and distinction in the areas of cancer, cardiovascular disease and neuropsychiatry.

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Elaine Fuchs awarded distinguished medal from New York Academy of Medicine

Fuchs, head of the Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at Rockefeller University, will be awarded the 2012 Academy Medal for Distinguished Contributions in Biomedical Science for her innovative and imaginative approaches to research in skin biology, its stem cells and its associated human genetic disorders. More »

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Sweat glands grown from newly identified stem cells

A team of researchers led by scientists at Rockefeller University have shown how sweat glands develop and how their cells respond to injury. Their research also identifies the stem cells within the sweat glands and sweat ducts and enables scientists to begin to explore the cells’ potential for making tissues for the first time. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive 2012 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

The award recognizes Fuchs’s contributions to our understanding of skin biology and skin stem cells, including discoveries that have led to advancements in treating skin cancer and severe burns.

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Cancer stem cells identified, offering new drug targets

Stem cell researchers at Rockefeller University have identified stem cells of squamous cell skin carcinoma, the second most common cancer in the world, and their molecular signature. The researchers find differences between cancer stem cells and healthy skin stem cells, which provide invaluable diagnostic marker and suggests the possibility to specifically target the root of cancer while leaving normal cells unaffected. More »

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Elaine Fuchs awarded 2011 Albany Medical Center Prize

Rockefeller scientist is recognized for her contributions toward realizing the vast potential of stem cells to treat and reverse disease. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive Passano Award

World leader in skin biology and its human genetic disorders is honored for landmark contributions to skin biology and its disorders, including genetic syndromes, stem cells and cancers. More »

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New genetic technique probes the cause of skin cell differentiation in mammals

Most complex genetic experiments have been done in simple model organisms like flies and worms, because they’re easier to work with. But new research at Rockefeller University has applied the technique of RNA interference to probe the DNA of our fellow mammal, the mouse. In the process, the researchers are uncovering a deeper understanding of cell differentiation in early development, and hope to apply the results to cancer research. More »

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Research shows when stem cell descendants lose their versatility

The precocious progenitors of every cell in the body — stem cells — have commitment issues. They must remain unattached to maintain the versatility they need to respond to injuries, regenerate tissues and do their other jobs. New research defines the point at which a developing lineage of hair follicle stem cells do settle down, however, and commit to their mission to grow new hair. The findings also reflect a new concept in stem cell biology: that the newly specialized cells send signals back to the stem cells from which they originated, regulating their behavior. More »

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Elaine Fuchs to receive 2010 L’Oréal-UNESCO prize for women scientists

Elaine Fuchs — one of five women scientists around the world selected by the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science partnership to receive the 2010 L’Oréal-UNESCO Awards in the Life Sciences — is honored for her contributions to our knowledge of skin biology and skin stem cells. More »

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Elaine Fuchs receives National Medal of Science

Elaine Fuchs, Rebecca C. Lancefield Professor, is being honored “for her pioneering use of cell biology and molecular genetics in mice to understand the basis of inherited diseases in humans and her outstanding contributions to our understanding of the biology of skin and its disorders, including her notable investigations of adult skin stem cells, cancers and genetic syndromes.” More »

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Epigenetic mark guides stem cells toward their destiny

Not all stem cells are completely blank slates. Some, known as adult stem cells, have already partially embraced their fates. Researchers now highlight the interactions between genetic and epigenetic regulators in skin stem cells and how these interactions change as stem cells begin the process of specialization. The findings may also lead to new therapies for prematurely born infants who have not yet fully formed the skin. More »

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Stem cells in hair follicles point to general model of organ regeneration

Most people consider hair as a purely cosmetic part of their lives. To others, it may help uncover one of nature’s best-kept secrets: the body’s ability to regenerate organs. New research now gets to the root of the problem, revealing that the hair follicle uses a two-step mechanism to activate its stem cells and order them to divide. The mechanism provides insights into how stem cells may be organized in other body tissues to support organ regeneration. More »

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Scientists identify a molecule that coordinates the movements of cells

An elaborate track of exceptionally strong proteins known as the extracellular matrix allows cells to migrate toward wounds and heal them. It also gives cancer cells a way to spread. Now, new research from Rockefeller University shows that a recently discovered molecule called ACF7 orchestrates and powers this directed movement. The finding offers a new potential target for setting up a roadblock for the spread of cancer. More »

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microRNA-203 helps build skin’s protective barrier

It’s a rough world, and exposed skin cells weather conditions harsh enough to mutate DNA. To keep these mutations from spreading, evolution has found a way to keep these cells from proliferating. In a series of elegant experiments, Rockefeller University researchers have now discovered evolution’s solution: a tiny strand of RNA. But the research’s implications go deeper, and may also suggest how healthy cells elsewhere in the body can turn cancerous. More »

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BMP protein maintains crosstalk between cells that control hair growth

Every cell has the same set of genes; it’s the combination of genes that are turned on or off that makes each type unique. Now, researchers at Rockefeller University have identified a signaling molecule that is critical for a type of skin cell, called dermal papilla, to ratchet up or clamp down the activity of genes that give them their molecular identity. Without these signals, these skin cells lose their hair-inducing properties — findings that may provide a new understanding of how stem cells differentiate. More »

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Protein that controls hair growth also keeps stem cells slumbering

By combining clinical and scientific research, scientists at Rockefeller University reveal that a protein involved in hair growth also keeps the skin’s stem cells from proliferating. This research raises questions about what stem cells need in order to maintain their ability to regenerate tissues — questions that may be key in developing treatments for patients with thinning hair. More »

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Balancing act protects vulnerable cells from cancer

Tumor-suppressing pathways usually suppress tumors. That’s a good thing. Even better? When a vital component of the pathway is removed, it continues to suppress tumors. Research led by Elaine Fuchs at Rockefeller University reveals that when epithelial cells lack a receptor called TβRII, the cells hyperproliferate, a potentially lethal process balanced by elevated levels of cell death. This balancing act occurs in all cells that express a major structural protein called keratin 14, but while some tissues remain healthy for life, others spontaneously develop a highly disfiguring and invasive form of skin cancer, one of the very few cancers on the rise. More »

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Initial trigger is not enough to determine a cell’s fate

Research uncovering how a signaling pathway regulates stem cell behavior reveals that adult stem cells continue to respond to their environment even after they are activated and can switch their developmental agenda, putting a whole new spin on our understanding of stem cells. More »

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Scientists clone mice from adult skin stem cells

The potential of stem cells has so far gone largely untapped, despite the great promise that stem cells hold. But new research from Rockefeller University now shows that adult stem cells taken from skin can be used to clone mice using a procedure called nuclear transfer. More »

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