Tag Archives: Joel E. Cohen

New findings suggest severe tornado outbreaks are increasingly common

New findings suggest severe tornado outbreaks are increasingly commonTornado outbreaks, in which multiple tornadoes arise within a limited time, are incredibly damaging. New research suggests that the number of tornadoes per outbreak has increased over the past 60 years, and that the likelihood of future extreme events is growing. More »

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Joel Cohen and Torsten Wiesel receive Golden Goose Awards for research with unexpected benefits

Joel Cohen and Torsten Wiesel receive Golden Goose Awards for research with unexpected benefits

The Golden Goose Award, which honors seemingly obscure federally funded research that has led to major breakthroughs, recognizes Cohen’s development of a map of human population by geographic altitude and Wiesel’s experiments showing cats dots or lights projected on a screen. Cohen’s project has had many applications in fields ranging from microchip manufacturing to human disease, while Wiesel’s discoveries led to a better understanding of the visual system, as well as improved treatment of childhood cataracts.

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In the News

Reducing Carbon by Curbing Population   “As the threat of climate change has evolved from a fuzzy faraway concept to one of the central existential threats to humanity, scholars like Professor [Joel E.] Cohen have noted that reducing the burning … More »

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In the News

Biology’s coefficient: Joel Cohen uses the tools of mathematics to deconstruct questions of life   “That study of Earth’s human population is only a drop in the bucket of the diverse, seemingly disparate, subjects that Cohen has addressed in his … More »

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Scientists identify nature’s insect repellents

Chemicals emitted by mosquito predators could lead to as environmentally friendly tactics for repelling disease-carrying insects. More »

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New book by population biologist asks why we educate children

Rockefeller University’s Joel E. Cohen hopes to launch an international conversation on the rationales for educating children, informed by diverse perspectives on why education should be a goal at all.v More »

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To better control Chagas disease, focus funds more efficiently, scientists say

Controlling the bug that causes Chagas disease, a chronic infection of 10 million people worldwide with no available cures or vaccines, is the primary goal of public health officials in the developing world. New research suggests that insecticide spraying should be concentrated during the seasons when bugs disperse over long distances to make the best use of limited resources. More »

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New formula predicts how people will migrate in coming decades

Countries use population projections to estimate local needs for things like jobs, schools, housing and health care, but coming up with those projections has been an inexact science. A newly developed, more precise formula to describe how people move between countries could lead to better use of resources and improved economic conditions. More »

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Data suggest community involvement is the key to controlling infectious disease

The battles against infectious diseases are challenging enough in Western countries with stable infrastructure and deep-pocketed pharmaceutical firms. In an impoverished section of Latin America, they are much more difficult. But new research from Rockefeller University’s Joel E. Cohen suggests that the key to managing insect-borne illnesses in developing areas is a technologically simple, humanly sophisticated approach of sustained community outreach. More »

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New means of predicting populations more accurately accounts for random influences

By studying the ways of little jar-bound cannibals — tiny flour beetles who like to eat their young — scientists at Rockefeller University have created techniques they believe are the best yet to capture how random “noise” affects the dynamics of a biological population. More »

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Humanity in transition

From a population perspective, the world is at a turning point. In the September issue of Scientific American, Rockefeller’s Joel Cohen describes how the population of the coming half century will be bigger, older, and more urban than ever before, and slower-growing than that of the previous 50 years. More »

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By the year 2050, human population could add 2.6 billion people, reports Rockefeller scientist Joel E. Cohen

It took from the beginning of time until 1950 to put the first 2.5 billion people on the planet. Yet in the next half-century, an increase that exceeds the total population of the world in 1950 will occur. So writes Joel E. Cohen, Ph.D., Dr.P.H., professor and head of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University and Columbia University, in a Viewpoint article in the November 14 issue of the journal Science.
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Food traffic

Ever since Charles Darwin wrote one of the first descriptions of a food web — outlining who eats whom — in 1838, biologists such as Rockefeller scientist Joel E. Cohen, Ph.D., Dr.P.H., have been studying patterns of ecological communities of species living together. In these ecological communities, big animals usually eat smaller animals, and small animals typically eat still smaller animals or plants (which are consumed by some big animals, too). Moreover, large predators tend to be rarer than small prey species. More »

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Researchers’ Mathematical Model Provides Chagas Disease Insight

By characterizing the discrete population dynamics of an individual household, and by collecting data for many individual households to serve as an empirical base, a Rockefeller University researcher and his Argentinean colleague have identified improved control tactics for a vexing public health problem. More »

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How Many People Can The Earth Support?

If the human population continued growing at the rate seen in 1990, the world would tally 694 billion people by the year 2150, the United Nations predicts. But that’s not likely, says Joel E. Cohen, Ph.D., professor and head of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University. More »

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Lecture: How Many People Can the Earth Support?

Come hear Joel E. Cohen, M.P.H., Ph.D., Dr.P.H., professor and director of the Laboratory of Populations at The Rockefeller University and author of the forthcoming book, How Many People Can the Earth Support?, due this December from W.W. Norton & Company, as he discusses how human choices about economies, environment, values and politics are just as important as supplies of food, water and livable land in determining Earth’s people capacity. More »

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