Tag Archives: Laboratory of Lymphocyte Biology

Rockefeller graduate Monica Mugnier wins 2016 NIH Early Independence Award

Monica MugnierA 2016 graduate of Rockefeller’s Ph.D. program, Mugnier is one of 16 junior scientists across the country to receive an Early Independence Award. The award, which is given as a five-year grant of up to $1.25 million, allows exceptional investigators to skip postdoctoral training and move immediately into independent research positions. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off sleeping sickness parasite

Study suggests new way to help the immune system fight off sleeping sickness parasiteThere are currently few treatments for the disease, and those that exist have substantial side effects. A new study reveals a method, involving epigenetic mechanisms, that causes the African sleeping sickness parasite to change into a new state, potentially making it easier for the host immune system to eliminate it. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Rockefeller’s newest faculty member investigates how antibodies are made

Rockefeller’s newest faculty member investigates how antibodies are madeGabriel Victora, an immunologist who studies the processes by which the immune system refines its response to an infection, will establish the Laboratory of Lymphocyte Dynamics in September of 2016 where he will study antibody responses at the levels molecules, cells, and whole organs. More »

Tags: , , , , ,

To survive, a parasite mixes and matches its disguises, study suggests

To survive, a parasite mixes and matches its disguises, study suggests A detailed look at the African sleeping sickness parasite’s strategy for evading its hosts’ immune systems revealed that the blood parasites assume a surprising diversity of protein coat disguises. In fact, the number of disguises necessary to maintain a long-term infection appears to exceed the functional genes that encode them. More »

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Scientists identify DNA that regulates antibody production

When foreign invaders trip the immune system’s alarm, antibodies need to be specially sculpted to attack them head on. New research now shows that gene segments called enhancers control the reshuffling of antibody genes that makes such a precise and coordinated attack possible. More »

Tags: , , ,