Tag Archives: Laboratory of Neurogenetics and Behavior

Sweet tooth? Flies have it too—and new research explains how they know what to eat and when to stop

Sweet tooth? Flies have it too—and new research explains how they know what to eat and when to stopIn studying the eating behavior of fruit flies, scientists have discovered a set of throat neurons that regulate food intake based on how hungry the flies are and whether they’ve had enough sugar. A similar neural circuit may exist in vertebrates, like us. More »

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In the News – The Atlantic – Vosshall

The Quest to Make a Better Mosquito Repellent   “It’s not easy for a human to find a mosquito that doesn’t want to be found, but a mosquito can locate us quite easily. It’s a human-seeking machine, sculpted by evolution … More »

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Mosquitoes are tuned to seek out temperatures that match warm-blooded hosts

Mosquitoes are tuned to seek out temperatures that match warm-blooded hostsResearchers have described a process that allows the insects to distinguish between temperatures with high precision to find their prey. Studies like this one may help generate better repellents, traps, and other ways to control mosquitoes. More »

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Leslie Vosshall and Jean-Laurent Casanova elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Jean-Laurent Casanova and Leslie Vosshall elected to the National Academy of Sciences

Vosshall, who investigates how sensory stimuli are perceived and processed, and Casanova, who studies the genetics of infectious disease susceptibility in children, are among the new members and foreign associates to be inducted into the Academy in 2015. With Vosshall and Casanova’s election, Rockefeller now boasts 36 members or foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences among its current faculty.

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Researchers master gene editing technique in mosquito that transmits deadly diseases

Researchers master gene editing technique in mosquito that transmits deadly diseasesRockefeller University researchers have successfully harnessed a technique, CRISPR-Cas9 editing, to use in an important and understudied species: the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which infects hundreds of millions of people annually with the deadly diseases chikungunya, yellow fever, and dengue fever. More »

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Jeffrey M. Friedman and Leslie B. Vosshall named 2014 AAAS Fellows

Rockefeller University scientists Jeffrey M. Friedman and Leslie B. Vosshall have been awarded the distinction of AAAS Fellow. Election as a fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. More »

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Research suggests how mosquitoes evolved an attraction to human scent

Research suggests how mosquitoes evolved an attraction to human scentTo understand the evolutionary basis of the mosquito’s attraction to humans, scientists examined the genes that drive preferences of two different subspecies. Their findings suggest that Aedes aegypti aegypti acquired a love for human body odor, a key step in specializing on people. More »

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Rockefeller postdoc named finalist for Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists

Agnel Sfeir, a postdoctoral fellow in Titia de Lange’s Laboratory of Cell Biology and Genetics, has been named a finalist in the fourth annual Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists competition, which recognizes the contributions of young scientists and engineers in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. More »

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Leslie Vosshall promoted to professor

A neurobiologist whose research focuses on the mechanism of smell has been granted tenure by the university’s Board of Trustees. More »

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Leslie Vosshall, Paul Greengard win Dart/NYU biotech awards

Rockefeller scientists receive honors for their contributions to next-generation insect repellents and drugs to treat neurological diseases. More »

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Rockefeller postdoc wins GE & Science Prize

Michael Crickmore has been named Grand Prize winner in the essay competition, which recognizes outstanding graduate students in molecular biology. Crickmore’s essay, titled “The Molecular Basis of Size Differences,” comes with $25,000 and publication in Science. More »

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