Tag Archives: Michel C. Nussenzweig

Adjunct faculty member Kayo Inaba receives L’Oréal-UNESCO Women in Science award

Inaba, a member of Michel Nussenzweig’s Laboratory of Molecular Immunology who previously worked in Ralph Steinman’s lab, is known for her work on specialized immune cells called dendritic cells. Inaba is being honored as the Asia-Pacific recipient of the L’Oréal-UNESCO Women in Science award, which supports eminent women in science throughout the world who are working in life and physical sciences. More »

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Potent antibodies neutralize HIV and could offer new therapy, study finds

Rockefeller researchers in Michel Nussenzweig’s Laboratory of Molecular Immunology have found that a newly-discovered class of especially potent antibodies is effective at neutralizing HIV infection in mice for a 60 day period, longer than current antiretroviral drugs which require daily application. The antibodies, which suppressed the virus when used in combination, could one day be given to humans to treat the disease. More »

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Nature online: February 7, 2012

Nature online: February 7, 2012 DNA damage defines sites of recurrent chromosomal translocations in B lymphocytes Ofir Hakim, Wolfgang Resch, Arito Yamane, Isaac Klein, Kyong-Rim Kieffer-Kwon, Mila Jankovic, Thiago Oliveira, Anne Bothmer, Ty C. Voss, Camilo Ansarah-Sobrinho, Ewy Mathe, Genqing … More »

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2011 Nobel Prize Ceremony to be webcast live

Tomorrow, the family of Nobel Prize winner Ralph M. Steinman, who died September 30, will accept the Nobel medal and diploma on his behalf from King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden. The ceremony will be Webcast live beginning at 10:20 a.m. Eastern Time. A video of the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony will also be available a few days later. More »

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Resident protection

To keep the body safe, the immune system enlists more than one form of protection. Rockefeller University scientists, working in collaboration with researchers at New York University, are learning about an important, but little-known, network of dendritic cells in lymph nodes through innovative, live-action imaging. More »

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Scientists identify broad and potent HIV antibodies that mimic CD4 binding

A new approach gives researchers the ability to isolate single antibodies as well as investigate entire families of highly active antibodies against HIV.
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Michel C. Nussenzweig elected to National Academy of Sciences

Michel C. Nussenzweig, Sherman Fairchild Professor and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences at the Academy’s annual meeting today, in recognition of his deep contributions to our understanding of the workings of the innate and adaptive immune systems. More »

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New class of ‘dancing’ dendritic cells derived from blood monocytes

The discovery of a new class of dendritic cells that stem from blood monocytes in mice promises to accelerate research into clinical therapies that use these cells, known to be the sentinels of the immune system. Much research has been done on classical dendritic cells, which are found in the lymph tissues of mice. But these are hard to come by in the case of humans. The new technique may allow the generation of “authentic” dendritic cells from human blood samples, however, which could make it much easier to advance dendritic cell-based vaccines and cancer treatments that are under development now. More »

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Research on killer HIV antibodies provides promising new ideas for vaccine design

By detailing the molecular workings of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies, found in so-called slow-progressing HIV patients, researchers hope to devise a way to arm those who are not equipped with exceptional immunological firepower. New clues reveal that some anti-HIV antibodies are especially sticky and target a previously unrecognized part of the virus. More »

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New HIV vaccine trial first to target dendritic cells

HIV has been able to outmaneuver every vaccine that’s been tried on the virus since it was first discovered in 1981. But no vaccine has yet to directly employ what is arguably the most powerful weapon the human immune system, the dendritic cells that orchestrate the body’s response to infection. Now that’s about to change. Researchers at Rockefeller University, where dendritic cells were discovered in 1973, are building on decades worth of research to launch a novel vaccine trial in hopes of mustering an immune response strong enough to defeat the deadly virus. It’s the first clinical trial of a dendritic cell based vaccine against infection, and researchers hope it will mark a turning point in the battle against AIDS. More »

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Researchers modify yellow fever vaccine to fight malaria

A genetically modified vaccine originally used to eradicate yellow fever could be the key to stopping a mosquito-borne scourge that afflicts much of the developing world. More »

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Immunologist Michel Nussenzweig elected to Institute of Medicine

The head of Rockefeller University’s Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Nussenzweig’s considerable contributions to the field of immunology include insights into how autoimmune diseases progress and the development of methods that may lead to dendritic-cell vaccines. Nussenzweig is one of 14 current Rockefeller researchers who are members of the Institute of Medicine. More »

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Research defines dendritic cell lineage

For more than 30 years, controversy has reigned over the question of how exactly to differentiate dendritic cells from their immune cell cousins, the monocytes. Now, research published in Science identifies a precursor to classical spleen dendritic cells that defines where such cells diverge from monocytes. The findings could have important implications for research on dendritic cell-based vaccines all over the world. More »

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A natural approach for HIV vaccine

Since HIV was first recognized in the early 1980s, scientists have tried and failed to develop a vaccine based on a handful of “super antibodies” that so far have been impossible to produce in humans. Now new research detailing the dynamic, natural immune response in “slow-progressing” HIV patients suggests that an effective HIV vaccine may come from a shotgun approach targeting several parts of the virus rather than a magic bullet targeting only one. More »

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An enzyme that mutates antibodies also targets a cancer-causing oncogene

The human immune system runs a risky business. It mutates its own DNA to diversify defenses against foreign invaders it has never before encountered. Unfortunately, these mutations sometimes miss the mark, and the result can be lethal cancer. Now Rockefeller University scientists have found that the same enzyme that enables an effective immune response is also responsible for the DNA breaks that cause lymphomas. More »

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Michel Nussenzweig wins Howley Prize for Arthritis Research

Michel C. Nussenzweig, head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology at Rockefeller University, is one of this year’s two winners of the Lee C. Howley Sr. Prize for Arthritis Research. The award will be presented at the Evening of Honors reception of the annual Arthritis Foundation meeting November 14. More »

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A new role for a critical DNA molecule in the immune system

Researchers find that a molecule that helps repair broken DNA is required for the genetic reshuffling that enables the immune system to adapt to new threats. The finding furthers our understanding of a process that is fundamental to our immune response but can also lead to cancers and other diseases when it falters. More »

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Scientists identify a key regulator of DNA mutations

As a general rule, your DNA is not something you want rearranged. But there are exceptions — especially when it comes to fighting infections. Now, two teams of researchers at Rockefeller University independently show how a tiny, recently identified molecule once implicated in cancer can not only help defend against it but also keep invading microbes at bay. More »

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Critical protein prevents damaged DNA from persisting through generations

When B lymphocytes lack the ATM protein, chromosomal breaks created during their maturation go unrepaired, and checkpoints that normally prevent the damaged cell from replicating are lost. More »

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Dendritic cells are replenished from blood

New research helps resolve an ongoing debate about where dendritic cells, which help direct the body’s immune responses, originate and how they multiply, especially in the spleen and lymph system. The findings are especially important for scientists developing immune-cell-targeted vaccines. More »

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