Tag Archives: Paul Greengard

Leslie Vosshall, Paul Greengard win Dart/NYU biotech awards

Rockefeller scientists receive honors for their contributions to next-generation insect repellents and drugs to treat neurological diseases. More »

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Mouse model reveals a cause of ADHD

New research in a mouse model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder suggests that the root of the psychiatric disorder might be the over-activity of a protein that regulates the brain’s reward-motivation system. The work suggests a path toward new treatments for symptoms including inattentiveness, over-activity and impulsivity. More »

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Loss of epigenetic regulators causes mental retardation

New findings, published in recent issues of Neuron and Science, indicate that malfunction of a protein complex that normally suppresses gene activation causes mental retardation in mice and humans and may even play a role in promoting susceptibility to drug addiction. More »

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2009 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize goes to pioneering geneticist

The 2009 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize recognizes Suzanne Cory, a world-renowned geneticist and pioneering scientific leader. The first woman to serve as director of Australia’s prestigious Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, she has been an influential force in shaping science policy in her nation. More »

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Brain protein may be a target for fast-acting antidepressants

It takes weeks or months for the effect of most antidepressants to kick in, time that can feel like an eternity to those who need the drugs the most. But new research suggests that a protein called p11 may be the key to developing drugs that begin to work in as little as two days. More »

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Ritalin may cause changes in the brain’s reward areas

A common treatment for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, prescribed millions of times a year, may change the brain in the same ways that cocaine does, a new study in mice suggests. More »

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Breakthrough in cell-type analysis offers new way to study development and disease

It’s sometimes said that disease does not discriminate, but that’s not true. Many diseases are very particular about the types of cells they attack, laying waste to one population while sparing its nearly identical neighbors for no apparent reason. New research from The Rockefeller University for the first time enables scientists to carefully study the biomolecular differences among types of cells in order to learn what makes some susceptible to attack and others resistant. More »

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For treating advanced Parkinson’s, new research points to serotonin

New evidence from a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease suggests for the first time that serotonin, a well-studied neurotransmitter involved in regulating mood, appetite, sexuality and sleep, also plays a crucial role in the world’s second most common brain disorder. More »

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Brain cells need microRNA to survive

New research from Rockefeller University shows that neurons that cannot produce microRNAs, tiny single strands of RNA that regulate the expression of genes, slowly die in a manner similar to what is seen in such human neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. More »

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Mice on Prozac help scientists find better depression treatments

By comparing mice that had been given Prozac with mice given an alternate drug, researchers have identified a new class of chemicals that could offer better control over serotonin and more effective treatments for the debilitating mental illness. More »

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Animal study suggests two amino acids may modulate addictive behavior

For some, living without alcohol, cigarettes or even coffee is a daily struggle. Others can give up their vices without ever looking back. From a biological standpoint, the difference may be as slight as a single amino acid, suggests new research from the Rockefeller University laboratories of Mary Jeanne Kreek and Paul Greengard. By tracking individual amino acids in a single protein in mice, and noticing how they change when the mice are given access to cocaine, scientists are beginning to understand how an individual’s underlying genetics can reinforce his addictive behavior. More »

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Phosphorylation of WAVE1 protein remodels neuronal connections

In a paper that marks the 50th anniversary of Paul Greengard’s first Nature publication, Greengard, Yong Kim and their colleagues show how an interaction of several proteins alters neurons’ scaffolding to regulate the size and density of dendritic spines in the brain. More »

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PLD1 protein is implicated in Alzheimer’s brain damage

Most current Alzheimer’s drugs target molecules responsible for memory formation but don’t address the root of the problem: plaques that build amid brain cells, causing them to weaken and die. Rockefeller scientists now say that a protein called PLD1 is closely linked to the pathways through which these plaques develop, and may be a target for new drugs that better treat Alzheimer’s. More »

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Scientists, linking gene with serotonin and depression, offer insights to new treatments

New research shows that a gene called p11 is closely related to serotonin transmission in the brain – and may play a key role in determining a person’s susceptibility to depression. Reported today in the journal Science, the researchers say their discovery could lead to new treatments for certain mental disorders. More »

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Mouse studies show brain’s “master molecule” produces same behavior from three different psychostimulant drugs

A mouse study reported in this week’s Science magazine shows that three drugs, each acting on a different chemical transmitter in the brain, all produce the same schizophrenia-like symptoms by acting on a single “master molecule” in the brain. More »

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Leukemia drug Gleevec slows accumulation of major component of senile plaques in cell studies and in guinea pigs

Gleevec, the breakthrough drug for treating chronic myologenous leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors, slowed the accumulation of the major protein component of senile plaques that characterize Alzheimer’s disease, in laboratory cultures of mouse brain cells and guinea pigs. More »

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Pivotal Brain Processor Decreased in Schizophrenia

New York, NY (August 14, 2002) — Levels of a pivotal signal processor in the brain are reduced significantly in people with schizophrenia, a study by scientists at The Rockefeller University, Weill Cornell Medical College and University of California at Irvine has found. More »

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Researchers Pinpoint How Estrogen Prevents Alzheimer’s “Senile Plaques”

Estrogen prevents the build-up of Alzheimer’s disease’s “senile plaques” in the brain by scooting key proteins through their normal pathways before they can form the debilitating plaques. More »

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More Studies Shed Light on How Prozac Works

Nobel laureate Paul Greengard, Ph.D., and other Rockefeller University scientists have illuminated, in laboratory mice, new details of the complex chemical interaction in the brain that is generated by Prozac, the widely prescribed drug for depression. More »

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Researchers Identify an Enzyme That Regulates the Action of Chronic Cocaine

Scientists have found that an enzyme called Cdk5 regulates the action of chronic cocaine in the brain. In a paper published in the March Nature, members of Paul Greengard’s Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience and colleagues at other institutions identify Cdk5’s role in the long-term changes associated with cocaine addiction. By combining behavioral and biochemical studies, they found that Cdk5 (which stands for cyclin-dependent kinase 5) is a key player in a series of biochemical events that occur in certain brain cells with exposure to chronic cocaine. More »

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