Tag Archives: Robert G. Roeder

Researchers discover new aspect of gene regulation and a possible target for cancer drugs

Researchers discover new aspect of gene regulation and a possible target for future cancer drugsThe expression of about three-quarters of a cell’s active genes is controlled by a process in which the DNA-transcribing enzyme hesitates before going to work. Experiments have identified the complex of proteins that helps restart this enzyme when it stalls, and so helped to explain how some promising cancer drugs work. More »

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Researchers identify potential new leukemia drug target

Researchers identify potential new leukemia drug targetIn some cases of acute myeloid leukemia, a mutant protein is known to cause dramatic changes in gene expression. Now researchers have identified a second protein with similar function that plays an even broader role in the disease. More »

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Luciano Marraffini and Robert Roeder recognized by ASBMB awards

Luciano Marraffini and Robert Roeder recognized by ASBMB awards

Marraffini, who studies the adaptive immune systems, known as CRISPR-Cas systems, found in some bacteria and used in genome editing, has won the Earl and Thressa Stadtman Scholar Award. Meanwhile, Robert Roeder, who investigates the mechanisms that regulate transcription, the process by which genes are copied into RNA, is the recipient of the Herbert Tabor Research Award.

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Influenza “histone mimic” suppresses antiviral response

Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism by which influenza viruses hijack key regulators of the human body’s normal antiviral response in order to slip by it undetected. The results have major implications for our understanding of the biology of the seasonal influenza virus and suggest a possible target for a new class of antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs. More »

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Albany Medical Center Prize awarded to James E. Darnell Jr. and Robert G. Roeder

Praised as “towering figures” in cell research, the scientists are being recognized for helping to define how cells grow, replicate, and become specialized, and in turn giving medical professionals and researchers the tools to improve health and combat diseases. James E. Darnell Jr., head of the Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, and Robert G. Roeder, head of the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, will share the $500,000 prize from the 12th annual award, given at a May 11 ceremony in Albany, NY.

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Robert G. Roeder to receive Salk Institute Medal for Research Excellence

Robert G. Roeder, head of the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, will receive the Salk Institute’s Medal for Research Excellence for his contributions to the understanding of RNA synthesis in animal cells. More »

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Muscle gene may provide new treatments for obesity and diabetes

In muscle, a protein called MED1 normally suppresses a genetic program that holds in check certain energy expenditure pathways. But when Rockefeller University scientists removed this gene in mice, a number of genes that are usually suppressed were activated, suggesting that targeting the Med1 gene could provide new therapeutical approaches to treating such metabolic diseases as obesity and diabetes. More »

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Activation of tumor suppressor gene p53 much more complex than previously believed

It’s the biochemist’s twist on the old light bulb jokes: how many proteins does it take to activate a gene? Scientists in Robert Roeder’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry at Rockefeller University now know that, at least for gene activation by the tumor suppressor p53, the answer is as many as five — and perhaps more — proteins for a single early step in this process. The researchers also provide the first direct evidence that chemical changes to DNA packaging proteins called histones regulate transcription, or activation, of p53 and other target genes, a finding that has major implications for the treatment of human diseases, including cancer. More »

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Lasker Award (“American Nobel”) honors Rockefeller University scientist Robert Roeder for pioneering studies of how human genes are switched on and off

Robert G. Roeder, Ph.D., a biochemist whose research has led to major advances in understanding how human genes are switched “on” and “off,” is this year’s recipient of the highly prestigious Albert Lasker Award for Basic Medical Research, the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation announced today. More »

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The making of a fat cell

The future of a young body cell is filled with uncertainties. Will it mature into a red blood cell and carry oxygen to remote tissues? Or might it become a liver cell and help rid the body of dangerous toxins? Ultimately, its destiny depends on a set of molecular signals that activate one of several possible cellular programs. More »

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More Than Just Packaging, Histones Help Turn Genes On

Histones, the proteins that help roll several feet of DNA into the microscopic span of a single nucleus, are turning out to be much more than just packaging material. Instead, recent studies indicate that these once underrated proteins actively participate in switching genes “on” — a vital life process occurring at all times in each one of our cells. More »

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Rockefeller Receives Horwitz Prize for Pioneering Work on How Genes are Turned On and Off

Rockefeller University biochemist Robert Roeder, Ph.D., received the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize from Columbia University on Thursday, Feb. 3. The prize, which Roeder shares with Robert Tjian, Ph.D., of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of California at Berkeley and Pierre Chambon, M.D., of the Université Louis Pasteur and the College de France, honors scientists for “outstanding basic research in biology or biochemistry.” More »

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Rockefeller University Scientists Receive Prestigious Awards for Cancer Research

Arnold J. Levine, Ph.D., newly appointed president of The Rockefeller University, and Robert G. Roeder, Ph.D., professor and head of the Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, have been recognized by the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation for their major contributions to cancer research. More »

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